Day of the Dead, Part III: Blending Traditions

ICTMN Staff
11/1/11

Day of the Dead or Dia de Los Muertos began as a Mexican holiday—a mixture of indigenous and Catholic religious beliefs—as a way to honor family members who are no longer among the living. The celebrations are recognized on November 2 following All Saints Day on November 1 and have seen similar celebrations appear around the world. Day of the Dead festivities can be found throughout Central and Latin America, along with areas of Europe and North America.

As with many traditions expanding and mixing with cultures the Day of the Dead festivities vary depending on the country and the groups. Some are more colorful than others, or offer more of a celebration of the life’s that once were, while others use it as a chance to reconnect, to catch up with the deceased loved ones.

Below are images of Day of the Dead celebrations from around the world:

Bolivia





Brazil



Ecuador


El Salvador


Guatemala


Haiti



Nicaragua



Peru



Spain


You need to be logged in in order to post comments
Please use the log in option at the bottom of this page

POST A COMMENT

Comments

ukumbwa's picture
ukumbwa
Submitted by ukumbwa on
It is always beautiful to see culture and tradition carried consciously and proudly. I am interested to know how much of the catholicity of these practices is really roman catholic in practice or if the syncretic nature of some of these traditions is merely a cover in the name of resistance to colonialism and cultural imperialism. It is questionable why we would still use the symbols of the oppressive society (i.e., cross, Jesus) if the imminence of colonialist violence has abated. Honoring the dead and creating functional relationship is always a good thing and this is important cultural sharing and opportunity for learning. Thank you so much, ICTMN!
1