The Week That Was: The Big Stories in Indian Country

ICTMN Staff
9/16/12

It was a week of international and political turmoil, with news coming out of Libya and Egypt as well as Indian country. As always, we've got your wrap up of what we covered this week.

-Mark Trahant wrote about how events in Libya this past week, with the American ambassador of Libya and three of his staff killed after riots presumably ignited after a anti-Islam movie made in America went viral, have reshaped the presidential election.

-We covered the fifth anniversary of the ratification of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP),w which was signed on September 13, 2007.

-Gale Courey Toensing wrote about how a selection panel, empowered by the Wabanaki tribal governments and the Maine State government, is seeking nominations for the Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The panel is to select five commissioners to serve on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) for the expected three-year lifespan of the commission.

-Vincent Schilling covered the historic victory for American Indian tribes as the owners of the sacred site Pe'Sla have agreed to the offer of $9 million to purchase roughly 1,900 acres of land (known to some as the Reynolds Prairie). The Rosebud Sioux Tribe has agreed to pay a 10% percent earnest deposit of $900,000.

-Mark Trahant asks, in his continuing election coverage for ICTMN, if Gary Johnson is the new Ron Paul? Johnson is a former Republican candidate for president now the Libertarian Party’s nominee. He’s also the former two-term governor of New Mexico.

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