Karlie Kloss on the runway at the 2012 Victoria's Secret Fashion Show.

Here We Go Again: Victoria's Secret Angel Karlie Kloss Dons Headdress

ICTMN Staff
11/8/12

Don't look now -- Huffington Post has published stills from last night's Victoria's Secret Fashion Show that depict model Karlie Kloss wearing the famous lingerie with a sacred feather headdress. A poll on the site asks whether the look is "offensive" or "just fine" -- with "just fine" currently in the lead at 54%. The show will air on CBS on December 4.

This happens less than a week after No Doubt took the unprecedented step of pulling a cowboys-and-Indians-themed music video off of YouTube the day after it was posted. And that was just a few days after Halloween, when we found ourselves posting about Aubrey O'Day's Halloween attire. We said it then -- we don't relish playing "costume cop." Yet a large proportion of Indian country finds these images worthy of discussion.

Even if that discussion is a debate about whether to have the discusssion.

So this headdress mania continues, this round having been kicked off, it seems, by a Lana del Rey video that went online a month ago. In case you missed that one -- skip ahead to the 7:00 mark:

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shethebear's picture
shethebear
Submitted by shethebear on
... not to mention this "fine" video We are the Kids by Blondfire (a song now playing across the airwaves in WA). There's tons of examples which pop up in social media everyday. Though cultural appropriation and stereotypes are not on the top of the list of things to address in Indian Country, it's important that it's address. There's no way to stay neutral. If no one speaks out about it, these images and the way they affect native youth and native people in general will continue. A shout out to Sonya Rosario and her film "The 'S' Word". I think that's an important film for everyone to watch to see examples of how stereotypes, images and words such as Squaw have real effects on native people.
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