two prominence eruptions, one after the other over a four-hour period on November 16, 2012 (Photo: NASA/SDO/Steele Hill)

Sun Belches Plasma, Directs It Away From Mother Earth

ICTMN Staff
11/20/12

It’s no secret that the sun is getting feistier. With solar maximum scheduled to peak over the next year or two, the sunspots are forming and erupting faster and more frequently. On November 20, NASA captured a giant plasma belch erupting from the sun, the space agency reported. That occurred a mere four days after a November 16 eruption, pictured. Neither came speeding toward Mother Earth, which as we know would have posed potential disruption danger to satellites and electrical systems. There were two consecutive November 16 eruptions within four hours, NASA said in a statement, photographed in extreme ultraviolet light. They can be seen on this video at Space.com. “It seems possible that the disruption to the Sun’s magnetic field might have triggered the second event since they were in relatively close proximity to each other,” NASA said. “The expanding particle clouds heading into space do not appear to be Earth-directed.” Author and City University of New York (CUNY) physics professor Michio Kaku called it a “hurricane from hell." "You're talking about an enormous ball of hot plasma, about 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit, shooting into outer space," Kaku told Fox News. "Fortunately we dodged the bullet this time. However, one day, we don't know when, if there's a direct hit it could be like being in the middle of a shooting gallery, and we could suffer a tremendous amount of damage." The sun, entering the high-activity period that it hits every 11 years or so, is perking up and set to peak in 2013–14. Luckily the November 20 coronal mass ejection (CME), as these plasma discharges are known, was also aimed away from Earth. Thus the biggest effect Mother Earth’s inhabitants will have is a great northern lights show for much of the week. Below is a stunner from August 31, 2012, which jetted out, also away from Earth, dwarfing one that had occurred NASA said in a statement, photographed in extreme ultraviolet light. They can be seen on this video at Space.com.

“It seems possible that the disruption to the Sun’s magnetic field might have triggered the second event since they were in relatively close proximity to each other,” NASA said. “The expanding particle clouds heading into space do not appear to be Earth-directed.”

Author and City University of New York (CUNY) physics professor Michio Kaku called it a “hurricane from hell."

"You're talking about an enormous ball of hot plasma, about 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit, shooting into outer space," Kaku told Fox News. "Fortunately we dodged the bullet this time. However, one day, we don't know when, if there's a direct hit it could be like being in the middle of a shooting gallery, and we could suffer a tremendous amount of damage."

The sun, entering the high-activity period that it hits every 11 years or so, is perking up and set to peak in 2013–14. Luckily the November 20 coronal mass ejection (CME), as these plasma discharges are known, was also aimed away from Earth. Thus the biggest effect Mother Earth’s inhabitants will have is a great northern lights show for much of the week.

Below is a stunner from August 31, 2012, which jetted out, also away from Earth, dwarfing one that had occurred earlier in August.

"It is hard to easily judge the size of this 3D event with a 2D image at this angle, but this filament is probably on the order of 30 Earths across, 300,000 kilometers or 186,000 miles," said C. Alex Young, a solar physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "When the filament expanded into space it quickly became more extended leaving the sun as a CME many solar diameters across, many millions of kilometers or miles."

0-mile-plasma-filament-129827" target="_self" title="Sun Whips Solar System Into Shape With 500,000-Mile Plasma Filament | Indian Country Today Media Network">earlier in August. "It is hard to easily judge the size of this 3D event with a 2D image at this angle, but this filament is probably on the order of 30 Earths across, 300,000 kilometers or 186,000 miles," said C. Alex Young, a solar physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "When the filament expanded into space it quickly became more extended leaving the sun as a CME many solar diameters across, many millions of kilometers or miles."

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