B2C: Native-Owned Businesses Drive Economic Progress

ICTMN Staff
1/10/13

Indian country knows Native American-owned businesses positively impact regional, state and national economies, while reinvesting in the local community. 

Now, more frequently, mainstream media are taking notice.

In a recent article, “Native American-Run Businesses Spur Economic Growth,” Business2Community.com (B2C) emphasized the significant contributions made by Indian-owned companies.

The article highlights two Chickasaw Nation-owned businesses and enterprises. In total, the tribe paid $318 million to employees in 2011, or $528 million when affiliated jobs are taken into account.

Cetan Corp.

Founded by Brad Scott, a Chickasaw veteran, this Chesapeake, Virginia-based tech company specializes in enterprise software solutions and related professional services for government and commercial organizations.

Among its 300 customers across Europe and the Americas are: Jo-Ann Fabrics, Weight Watchers, Wendy’s, Sony Pictures, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Library of Congress and Department of Veteran Affairs.

Cetan Corp. was ranked No. 119 on Inc. 5000’s list of top companies in 2011, reported B2C.

Bedré Fine Chocolate

Purchased by the Chickasaw Nation in 2000, Bedré Fine Chocolate is gourmet chocolate at its finest.

"We contract out with some of the big name, high-end retailers, [including] Neiman Marcus, Bloomingdale's, Hard Rock Cafe and also Ralph Lauren's daughter has a new up scale candy line in New York City," Niclas Carlsson, general manager of Bedré, told K10-TV in Texoma, Oklahoma

The company’s new product line Champoli, the Chickasaw word for sweet, melts chocolate with traditional Chickasaw foods, like roasted corn and pecans, reported B2C.

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troywiipongwii's picture
troywiipongwii
Submitted by troywiipongwii on
I am a bit surprised stories such as these go not receive more attention. Entrepreneurship has long been the go to, to help immigrant communities rise from the forgotten of american society, to being self-reliant and resilient. One of the biggest impediments to indian country is the lack of awareness this current generation has in it's ability to actually achieve self-sufficient autonomous groups, by engaging in enterprise. none the less it is still great to see the few successes that are broadcast.
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