Courtesy Chickasaw Nation
Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby, center, is congratulated by Oklahoma Historical Society Board of Directors President Emmy Stidham, left, and Oklahoma Historical Society Executive Director Dr. Bob Blackburn, right, after he was inducted into the Oklahoma Historians Hall of Fame. Gov. Anoatubby was honored at a special gala in Clinton, Okla., last week. He was one of three Oklahomans cited by the society.

Chickasaw Nation Governor Inducted into Historians Hall of Fame

ICTMN Staff
5/15/13

Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anaotubby was inducted into the Oklahoma Historians Hall of Fame on April 19.

“It is a great honor to be accepted into the Oklahoma Historians Hall of Fame,” Anoatubby said in a press release. “The Chickasaw Nation and Oklahoma have a deep and unique history, one that started before statehood. It is an honor to be recognized alongside those who have made an impact in preserving Oklahoma culture, traditions and history.”

Anoatubby, who is from Tishomingo, Oklahoma, has been governor of the Chickasaw Nation since 1987. In that time he has worked to preserve Chickasaw culture including restoring the Chickasaw Capitol Building in Tishomingo and the Chickasaw White House in Emet, Oklahoma.

His leadership has also resulted in the creation of Chickasaw Press, a publishing company that focuses on books about Chickasaw culture, language and history; the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma where Natives and non-Natives can learn about the Chickasaw culture; as well as feature films focusing on Chickasaw history.

Anoatubby was honored at a luncheon of the Oklahoma Historical Society in April.

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Joe's picture
Joe
Submitted by Joe on
That's some hard work, right there. A srltggue to tell a story of srltggue...but that's often how it goes.And thisTo build the free curriculum companion for Native Daughters, 14 educators half of them enrolled tribe members from Native schools spent a week in the summer of 2011 breaking down the content to make the stories connect to students and teachers both on and off the reservation.is outstanding.
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