Associated Press
What Manhattanhenge looks like on a clear day.

Manhattanhenge on the Half-Grid Obscured, Full Sun Version Has Hope

ICTMN Staff
5/28/13

If it weren’t pouring rain and overcast, we would be seeing the famous phenomenon known as Manhattanhenge right now. That is, the setting sun would be aligning with the street grid of New York City’s Manhattan Island.

To all intents and purposes, the sun didn’t even rise today, so we will not see it set. Instead of the glowing orb hanging over the Hudson River, we see fog enshrouding the skyscraper tips. However, the clouds’ silver lining is that there are a few more chances to catch this annual event, whose name is coined from the Stonehenge monument in England. Those monoliths are set up to bracket the sun as it shines between two of them at the summer solstice, which this year falls on June 21, 2013 at 1:04 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, according to Timeanddate.com.

The May 28 Manhattanhenge is just the half-sun one anyway. It may clear up for the Full Sun on the Grid, as astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has termed it. That falls on May 29 at 8:15 p.m., and again on July 12 at 8:23 p.m. The farther east one is, the better the view, says deGrasse Tyson, director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History.

Likewise, there’s another chance to see the Half Sun on the Grid on July 13, at 8:24 p.m., says deGrasse Tyson on the museum’s website

More on Manhattanhenge:

'Manhattanhenge' Sends Golden Rays Shooting Across Lenape Territory

Manhattanhenge Returns to Bathe NYC Cross Streets at Sunset a Second Time

You need to be logged in in order to post comments
Please use the log in option at the bottom of this page