The Week That Was: The Big Stories in Indian Country, September 8, 2013

ICTMN Staff
9/8/13

It's our weekly roundup of the stories that mattered most in Indian country

HOMES ON THE RANGE: Financing unimaginable two decades ago is generating a large ripping sound on the desert plateaus of New Mexico. The noise is the welcome sound of barriers to homeownership being torn down for tribes in the state.

ANTI-MASCOT EFFORT: The Oneida Indian Nation has launched changethemascot.org, a site that will offer football fans ideas and tools to further the cause of changing the mascot of the Washington, DC NFL team.

GROUP GOES TO COURT: On September 6, six Blackfeet tribal members who are part of a group calling itself the Blackfeet Against Corruption, pleaded not guilty in tribal court to charges of assault and other disorderly conduct.

PROFESSOR X'ED: Michigan State University professor William Penn’s fall classes have been assigned to other professors after a student secretly recorded his views on Republicans during the first lecture of the semester.

ON THE CATWALK: Native designers Sho Sho Esquiro and Cree Nisga'a Clothing showed their creations at Couture Fashion Week in New York City.

SAVING LACE: Lace found at the Spiro Mounds in eastern Oklahoma by a University of Oklahoma excavation team in the 1930s has been classified as one of the state’s top 10 most endangered artifacts.

FUNDS FOR EVERYONE: Concerned that unclaimed monies involving the Keepseagle settlement could be misdirected by plaintiffs’ lawyers in the case, the Choctaw Nation has asked a federal court to intervene and direct a sizeable portion of the funds to the tribe’s foundation.

EMPOWERMENT ZONES: A limited pilot plan that would aid reservation economies by promoting tax-friendly incentives for private business creation and growth could easily have enough support in Congress to get done this year, tribal analysts say, but, for a myriad of reasons, legislators have yet to include it in their larger tax reform proposals.

THE DJ AND THE REDSKINS: Ian Campeau, better known as Deejay NDN, member of and frequent spokesman for Canadian electronic dance music act A Tribe Called Red, has filed a discrimination complaint against the Nepean Redskins with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.

 

You need to be logged in in order to post comments
Please use the log in option at the bottom of this page

Read more