The Week That Was: The Big Stories in Indian Country, January 26, 2014

ICTMN Staff
1/26/14

It's our roundup of the stories that mattered most in Indian country:

WELCOME BACK: It has been a month of sweat lodges, job searching and spending time with his wife for Brandon Olebar as the Nuu-chah-nulth/Sto:lo man eases back into normal life after a decade of  imprisonment for a crime he did not commit.

FIXING FEMA: With disaster assistance now available to tribes through the 2013 Stafford Act, the Navajo Nation has set out to streamline the process of applying for its residents.

FAREWELL: Artist and AIM activist Bill Soza, also known as Billy War Soldier, has walked on.

BEAR WITNESS: Actress Misty Upham, who currently appears in August: Osage County and is also known for Jimmy P. and Frozen River, is hoping to use her star power to improve the lives of captive bears.

PELTIER BOOST: James Anaya, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, made a historic visit to American Indian Movement member Leonard Peltier in prison on Friday – an event expected to boost the growing movement to free the American Indian activist who is believed by Amnesty International and other organizations to be a political prisoner.

CASE DISMISSED: A lawsuit claiming that the current Oklahoma license plate is a violation of a Methodist minister’s First Amendment rights and a promotion of “pantheism” has been dismissed in federal court.

SAFETY REPORT: Radical, revolutionary, exceptional or just plain common sense are some of the terms used to describe "A Roadmap to Making Native America Safer," the result of two years' work by the nine-member Indian Law and Order Commission established by the Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010.

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