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The moon and Venus in a configuration similar to what they'll look like on Wednesday February 26, just before dawn.

Moon and Venus Get Down Before Dawn as Winter Diamond Graces Night Sky

ICTMN Staff
2/22/14

Having admired one another from afar during the early part of February—one in evening and the other in the barely nascent morning—the moon and Venus will reunite in the pre-dawn sky this week.

On Tuesday February 25, just as dawn arrives, the crescent moon will hover to the upper right of Venus in the southeast, Earthsky.org tells us. By Wednesday February 26 the two will have changed places.

“During dawn on Wednesday the 26th, Venus shines to the upper right of the waning Moon low in the southeast,” Sky and Telescope says. “At the time of dawn in the Americas they appear closer together than they did on Tuesday morning.”

Venus is shining its brightest this month for the year, making its meeting with the moon all the more poignant as they greet the day.

“These two brilliant beauties will climb over the eastern horizon in the predawn darkness, and will continue to light up the morning twilight till after all stars have been washed from the sky,” says Earthsky.org. “Sharp-sighted people might even see the moon and Venus after sunrise.”

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The fun continues on Thursday when, about 30 minutes before sunrise, Venus will shine in contrast to a now uber-thin crescent moon that has Mercury to its lower left. You might need a pair of binoculars for that last one.

Of course, no stellar rendezvous would be complete without a diamond, and the skies will deliver. Saturday night at 8 or 9 p.m. on February 22, the big and bright Winter Diamond will stand upright in the south, according to Sky and Telescope. The diamond has brilliant Jupiter at the top, Sirius at the bottom and the stars Procyon and Betelgeuse forming the two side corners, Sky and Telescope says.

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