Thinkstock/Konstantin Grishin
Bison in Yellowstone National Park. Those that stray outside the northern borders in winter are liable to be scooped up and shipped to slaughter.

Yellowstone Bison Slaughter Over, Controversy Remains

ICTMN Staff
3/14/14

Although ranchers do not support the release of bison outside the park, a study conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Wildlife Conservation Society found recently that bison can be quarantined and determined to be brucellosis-free. This makes it safe to take young bison out of Yellowstone and combine them with herds elsewhere without risking brucellosis transmission to a new set of animals, the study authors said.

“The results of this study indicate that under the right conditions, there is an opportunity to produce live brucellosis-free bison from even a herd with a large number of infected animals like the one in Yellowstone National Park,” said Dr. Jack Rhyan, APHIS Veterinary Officer, in a statement released by the Wildlife Conservation Society. “Additionally, this study was a great example of the benefits to be gained from several agencies pooling resources and expertise to research the critical issue of brucellosis in wildlife.”

Brucellosis, which causes miscarriage in the animals, can be passed on to a cow that comes in contact with the aborted fetus of a bison, elk or cattle. The study took young bison from an infected herd and kept them long enough to calve. The animals and their offspring were tested for brucellosis and found to be disease-free, rendering them safe, the Bozeman Daily Chronicle reported.

Yellowstone bison are the most genetically pure, meaning they are a match for the herds that used to thunder across the Great Plains, a mainstay of culture and sustenance for Indigenous Peoples. An agreement with Montana mandates the park to keep the bison population at 3,200 in its northern herd and 1,400 in the central, the latter being the one that tends to migrate out of the park in winter.

Meanwhile acrimony erupted between two tribes that are historical enemies when a Blackfoot man accused the Nez Perce of killing pregnant female bison. Nez Perce Tribal Chairman Silas Whitman spoke out after James St. Goddard of the Blackfoot Confederacy showed up at Montana Governor Steve Bullock’s office bearing a bloody bison heart in a plastic bag. Whitman said that although they did not agree with the methods used, Nez Perce members welcomed the meat. The Salish Kootenai, Umatilla and Nez Perce all have hunting rights outside the park, according to the Helena Independent Record, while the Blackfoot do not.

“We deal with the hand we’ve been given, and our people need to eat,” said Whitman.

RELATED: Shot, Left to Rot: Montana Officials Kill Bison Bull Wandering Outside Yellowstone National Park

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indianmedicine's picture
indianmedicine
Submitted by indianmedicine on
"Buffalo Ranching" is part of the nations, and NAI Nations Infrastructure. .......................................................................................................................... I would venture to say that the Excess Herd, could and should be used for Native American Ranching, either of Buffalo or "Beef-a-Lo" for these Cash Strapped communities and the Unemployed............................................... "Agribusiness" can Profit many, and "Put Food On The Table"................. ........................................................................................................................... "Animal Husbandry" is a Vocation and learned discipline, and anyone involved in Education, Animal Medicine, Agriculture,and Business knows this or reasonably should know this as they perform their Vocations Day to Day. ............................................................................................................................ Let the Community Colleges be the Start of Teaching and Qualifying our Young in Agribusiness of Buffalo Ranching - and you will see a dedicated group of people doing something to support the internal Infrastructure of this nation so badly needed.................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................... Let The Circle of Nations Elders be presented with this concept, and move on it before more time and resources are wasted because of "Poor Vision" of the "Over Sight" of the herds and NAI People.................................................... ...........................................................................................................................

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
There are similar controversies here in New Mexico. For instance, there is a wild horse heard that wanders freely on White Sands Missile Range, but they occasionally cut back their numbers while providing meat for dog food companies. The biggest problem are the Oryx who were transplanted here. They are too large to have natural predators and they decimate food sources for all larger animals in an area. They also have organized hunts to cut back their numbers. Being Apache, I feel a kinship with the wild horses and wish there could be alternatives to slaughter. I lament the White man's method of round up and slaughter. This is always their answer to things they don't like and as WWII has proven, they're even willing to do it with people.
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