Requiem for Mrs. Doubtfire: NDN Geek's Farewell to Robin Williams

Jeffrey Veregge
8/12/14

I remember the first time I saw Robin Williams on TV. I was around four years old and my little sister was watching Mork & Mindy. Now, one would think the premise of an alien would pique my interest in watch this show, but that wasn't the case. Mork & Mindy appeared one the same night as a show I loved: Buck Rogers, staring Gil Gerard.  So I never watched more than one or two episodes of Mork & Mindy.  I was lucky that Robin ‘s career did not end there, as I along with most of the world needed a good laugh.

Yesterday, like so many people across the globe, I was at work when I heard that we lost Robin Williams, a true comedic genius. I was saddened and heart stricken. If you were to go around and ask most Americans, Native or otherwise, to name their 10 favorite films, I am sure most would have a Robin Williams film in their list. He was electric in every sense of the word. His characters are among the most memorable ever committed to screen and if you caught any of his stand-up routine, you saw why so many wanted to work with him.

My personal favorites were more on the lighter side of Mr. William’s film career. Popeye, Mrs. Doubtfire, Hook, Aladdin, Flubber and The Birdcage. I quote many of these films regularly in my house, and so does the rest of my family. It was one Robin Williams’ films inspired one of my more memorable pranks. When I worked at my Tribe’s gaming facility many years ago, I would call up our smoke shop and do my best Mrs. Doubtfire impression and kindly ask the workers (who were almost always family) to go grab a couple of dirty magazines and put them in a brown paper bag so I could come down and pick them up discreetly for my husband.  I always went into some detail that would make the worker feel slightly uncomfortable and forced them to take the action that was requested to avoid hearing any more.  About 15, 20 minutes later I would walk over, grab a Coke and ask for the magazines in the voice I did over the phone. Every time, it was almost always “Dammit Jeffrey!” or worse and gave us all good laugh. Thanks again Mick.

It is hard for me, and so many others I am sure, to imagine a world without Robin. His films both comedic and dramatic will live long in the hearts and minds of his fans. For me, I feel like the world got a little less funny with his passing, and I hate the idea that none of us will ever see a new performance from him. But like the losses we all suffer in our lives, we shall hold on to the great memories Robin created and know if we need a good laugh that all we have to do is put on one of his films, guaranteeing a better day.

Rest in peace Robin Williams. Thank you for sharing your gift and unique vision with us, you enriched our lives with smiles and laughter and will surely be missed.

 

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