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Fake Black Folks, Fake Indians, and Allies: The Native Roots of the Rachel Dolezal Saga

Gyasi Ross
6/12/15

“Everybody wanna be a nigga but nobody wanna be a nigga.”

—Paul Mooney

Paul Mooney could have easily been talking about Natives. 

Ok, so, this white woman named Rachel Dolezal did a reverse Michael Jackson and became a black woman named Rachel Dolezal.

Thing was, she wasn’t cool with just being some newly black woman named Rachel Dolezal.  She wanted to be the blackest of the black women—became president of the NAACP, told folks that she had black children, became an activist for black folks, wore her “natural” in kinky curls, and made many, many allegations that she was the victim of hate crimes because she was black.  She was consistent at least—when she said that she was Native American, she said that she was also the Nativest of the Natives.  She was born in a tipi and hunted with bows and arrows.

In both events, she committed completely to her character change.

Thing was, her black child wasn’t her child—that was her adopted brother. Her “natural” hair was not kinky curls—it was straight blonde.  She was never, in fact, the victim of hate crimes—she made them up. 

Black folks, welcome to the bizarre world that is being Native in 2015.  Folks (primarily white folks) completely commit to becoming Native and swear up and down, on a million braids of sweetgrass, that they are indeed Native.  Now granted, we are responsible for SOME of this—it seems that some goofy Natives believed the lie (called a “legal fiction”) created by the Supreme Court, that “Native” is not an ethnicity, that it’s only a “political status.” 

That’s right—somehow, some Natives believe that since a bunch of old white dudes and one black dude on the Supreme Court said that being “Native” isn’t a race, it must be true (Morton v. Mancari). 

Excuse me while I LOL.

But I digress.

Point is, Sister Dolezal is a situation that happens entirely too often within Native communities.  And honestly, that’s really no big deal—people are allowed to believe they are whoever they want to be.  I used to think that I was Superman, and as a result broke my arm jumping off a two-story building.  

But it brings up interesting questions about identity, influence, inspiration, and straight up theft.  These are identity questions that the Native community has entertained for some time.  In this post-Bruce Jenner world, where everyone seems to be comfortable looking at identity as fluid and determined by what a person feels, those questions seem to be popping up elsewhere as well.

For some reason, there’s a small subset of Natives who are infatuated with this notion that people are stealing from Native culture every time we see a pseudo-Native design or image within the mainstream.  Largely, those things are simply influenced or inspired by Native imagery—why not?  It’s beautiful imagery.  Those things are not Native identity—they’re tokens or symbols of Native identity.  As John Mohawk said, “Culture is a learned means of survival in an environment.”  Those things are merely tools of that means of survival. 

Similarly, black folks are the most influential pop culture force in the world right now. 

Look, everyone listens to some variation of hip-hop, rock and roll or jazz—those are all black music forms, created by black folks for black audiences.  Eventually, other groups began to listen to those forms and enjoy them because they’re awesome. In fact, now there are Native rappers, rockers, jazz musicians just like there are white rappers, rockers and jazz musicians and really every color under the radar. In more recent times, we see variations of the black movement, #BlackLivesMatter and it has resulted in other ethnic groups taking that same form and saw the beauty/utility in and have used it.  For example, within some Native communities we now see some folks positing #NativeLivesMatter as a movement.

That’s simply influence and inspiration. That’s positive. #NativeLivesMatter isn’t trying to steal from black culture and Frank Waln isn’t stealing from black culture with his powerful hip-hop songs.  They know where those movements came from and acknowledge their black roots.  If anything, it’s an homage. 

But back to Rachel Dolezal.  I really don’t have a problem when people pretend to be a different race—it likely speaks to a spiritual void within their lives, where they feel completely and fundamentally dissatisfied with who they are.  And that’s sad.  But whatever—I really have no problem if some searching white woman or dude wants to dance at a pow-wow (it is oftentimes hilarious though) or raps badly, like the kid from Beverly Hills 90210.  BUT…It’s different when a person tries to steal the racial identity of a particular race for financial/professional/some other reward.  Just like Ward Churchill took opportunity away from real ethnic and political Natives by saying that he was Native on job applications.  Rachel Dolezal took real opportunity away from real black folks when she said that she was black (and Native American) in her application to be Chair of the city of Spokane’s Office of Police Ombudsman Commission and also when she applied to be part-time professor at Eastern Washington University.

That’s stealing.  That’s not influence.  That’s not inspiration. 

It happens oftentimes with Natives in higher education.  “Box checkers.”  People say they’re Native to make their competition pool smaller and really have no connection to Native people.  We’re not simply a “political group,” like the Supreme Court thinks.  There’s an actual ethnic component—we’re both, a political group AND a race.  NOTE TO ALLIES: YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE LIKE US—LOOK LIKE US, SPEAK LIKE US, WEAR TURQUOISE, WEAR DREADLOCKS, DYE YOUR HAIR JET BLACK, PRETEND THAT YOU’RE FROM PINE RIDGE, KEEP YOUR NAVAJO LAST NAME—IN ORDER TO BE OUR ALLIES!! 

We love you, but we need your work, not your looks.

Black folks, welcome to the bizarro world that Native people experience in 2015—where everybody wants to be you (and actually tries!!), but nobody wants to be you.

Gyasi Ross, Editor at Large
Blackfeet Nation/Suquamish Territories
NEW PROJECT "ISSKOOTSIK" (BEFORE HERE WAS HERE)
AUDIOBOOK AVAILABLE NOW at shop.krecs.com
Twitter: @BigIndianGyasi

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Vanessa Walker
Vanessa Walker
Submitted by Vanessa Walker on
i have a lot to learn as i didn't think she did that much wrong but after reading this i understand thank you for your enlightenment and may your wisdom continue to shine

Diana Schooling
Diana Schooling
Submitted by Diana Schooling on
These comments are ridiculous. There are tons of bona fide Natives who look white to those with Plains ancestry. Southeast and Northeast tribes have been intermarrying with Irish, Scots, etc., for over 400 years. Northeast tribes never had black hair anyway, even before intermarriage. This is the "lie" of Edward Curtis, early 20th century photographer. In his attempt to document Indigenous peoples of the Plains, Southwest, and West Coast before too much assimilation had occurred, it led the general public to believe that *all* Natives look like that. We don't; we haven't for quite some time. I am Swiss, Muscogee-Creek, Seminole (including West African ancestry), and Cherokee. I have it all documented---I know what Swiss town my great-grandmother came from, I know which Muscogee-Creek Chief I am descended from . . .and his wife: the daughter of Seminole War Chief Halleck Tustenugee and his West African wife. I know about, and have pictures of, my Cherokee great-great-grandma and her 8 children. I am blonde, blue-eyed, and I have sickle cell trait---as mentioned above, directly descended from *two* tribal chiefs. I know my clans. Because I ended up with Swiss hair and eye-color (with the Native bone structure most don't look long enough to notice), does this mean I'm not Native? Or of black ancestry? Hardly. The Cherokee and the Muscogee-Creek intermarried with Germans, Irish, and Scots. Cherokee Chief John Ross was, by DNA percentage, 1/8 Cherokee and 7/8th Scots. Muscogee-Creek Chief William MacIntosh was 1/10th Muscogee-Creek and 9/10th Scots. I know Natives who are only 1/8th white who are blonde and blue-eyed. You can never tell about people by their outsides.

Patti Broom
Patti Broom
Submitted by Patti Broom on
The Indian history and communities should never be 'belittled by silly little people' trying to copy/ imitate or take on their noble lifestyle and heritage. The Indian nation as a whole are a proud noble nation of people who quite rightly try to protect their own, their traditions and all they believe in. We can only respect their ways and lifestyle and maybe hope to from them and re-learn some of the respect they have for our Earth and its future conservation.

georgeprice's picture
georgeprice
Submitted by georgeprice on
Nice essay, Gyassi. I especially like your comments on what is and is not cultural appropriation. Regarding the topic of "White" appropriation of jobs, culture, (and mates?) that rightfully belong to specific cultures and peoples of color. This is a very serious issue, especially when it comes to the mocking of any indigenous culture's spiritual traditions, but also when it deprives people of opportunities to establish their personal careers and economic security, etc., as well as the opportunity to use their talents and skills in ways that will benefit and uplift their own particular communities. In the case of this Dolezal woman, though, as I read in the Spokane newspaper yesterday, there was no racial requirement for the NAACP position, nor for her teaching position at EWU, but there seems to have been one for the police monitoring board position. Nevertheless, she should not have lied about her racial identity, but like I've said before, all racial identities are fraudulent and pulled out of thin air, anyway, because the race concept itself is an invalid colonialist construct used by vicious, predatory people to divide and conquer the various victims of colonialism. Specific tribal identities, and cultural identities, however, are valid. The newspaper articles also mentioned that Dolezal's employers at EWU and the NAACP, and a few of her students who were interviewed were very pleased with her work and her consistent, energetic advocacy for human rights, but, of course they have some questions that they would like for her to answer, which I understand from today's paper will be dealt with on Monday. It has also been pointed out that about half of the membership of the Spokane NAACP chapter are societally-identified "White people." An interesting question to explore may be, however she arrived there, is Rachel Dolezal now part of the African American community of Spokane? How is membership in that community defined? Do they have a blood quantum requirement? That is all I want to say about Dolezal. Let's get back to the more pertinent and increasingly-popular, though not well-understood topic of "cultural appropriation." I like what you point out in this essay regarding the fact that we should not get the ages-old human practice of cross-cultural inspiration, adaptations and cultural sharing confused with actually harmful forms of appropriation. As the picture at the top of this article demonstrates, sacred things like the eagle feather headdress, which most non-Indigenous people have no knowledge about at all and probably just think of it as an "Indian hat," the sweat lodge and other sacred ceremonies, and many false claims about identity and culture, should be off limits to people who do not belong to those cultures. But, I see another problem in the anti-appropriation movement. Much of what has been identified as cultural appropriation has been framed in terms that I would call "racial appropriation." Because U.S. Americans, including indigenous Americans, have been so deeply conditioned to perceive human variation in racialized terms, issues of cultural appropriation often are stated in terms along the lines of, "Those White people shouldn't be touching Indian people's stuff!", rather than a more specific culturally framed admonition like, "People who are not from a tribe of the Plains in which the Eagle feather headdress is a sacred tradition passed on to select individuals who earn that honor have no business making and wearing fake "Indian" headdresses." If we are really opposing cultural appropriation, the term "people" in that last sentence should mean ALL people, including members of indigenous tribes who are not from the Plains and do not have the eagle feather headdress as part of their own specific cultural traditions. In other words, it is just as much a case of cultural appropriation for an Apache to wear an eagle feather headdress as it is when a Euro-American non-tribal person wears one. It would also be cultural appropriation for a Lakota man to conduct a Dine' corn blessing ceremony, or for a Seminole to conduct a Sun Dance, or for the Makah tribe to hold a Muskogee Busk.

Fawna Bluefeather
Fawna Bluefeather
Submitted by Fawna Bluefeather on
How come,Every body is Cherokee or part Cherokee or Their Grand mother, was a Cherokee. Princess.. or Grand father was Chief.. ? How, Come Being 1/4 white, Doesn't, Make A Black person white.?..How come, Being 1/4 white .Doesn't make A Native Person ( like me ) white.? So. How could. 1/16th Cherokee, Make you native ? To People .Who want to argue the point and DRONE on and on About Their INDIANESS.. PLEASE.. SPARE ME the GORRY .. DEATILES....Bla.. Bla indian princess..blablablala cheorkee.. Bla bla bla.. That what This Real Native Hears..

Fawna Bluefeather
Fawna Bluefeather
Submitted by Fawna Bluefeather on
How Come.. Being 1/4 White,doesn't , Make A black person White...? How come Being 1/4 white Doesn't ,Make A native....( like me ) doesn't make me white.. How come every body Is part Cherokee...? And Their Grand Mother was a princess..And Grand father was A chief.. How come, These people can tell .. Us, what, native IS.. What, We, did In the old days... How we did IT ,, When we did IT ,Why, we did IT .. They... WERE NOT THEIR... BUT they know .. All about Native Americans.. Ya.. Right... To those People.. Go Get A LIFE and CULTURE... WE DONT need you IN Ours.... Can you Imagine, me Trying to pass, my self as white... I Look Native,, Black Hair an All

Steves's picture
Steves
Submitted by Steves on
The Lumbees who have nothing originally indian at all ,no language ,no customs or culture nor Dna has shown no indian but have with little success pretended to be Lost Indians with a state political recognition(requires no real proof)! well said !! sounds like the Lumbee scam.....exactly but long running First Croatan,Lost Colony lie having failed and sworn too....the Lumbee then swore to be Cherokee of Robeson county before congress...seeking some federal monies...its called lie switching,,,, PETITION OF CROATAN INDIANS.To the honorable the Congress of the United States,December 1887.For any moneys you may see fit for us. “The undersigned,your petitioners,a part of the Croatan Indians.SWEAR Descent from the Lost Colony of Roanoke”1887 signed by James Oxendine, Ashbury Oxendine, Zackriors Oxendine, J.J. Oxendine, Billy Locklear, Malakiah Locklear, Preston Locklear, John Ballard, Crolly Locklear, G.W. Locklear, Patrick Locklear, Luther Deas, Marcus Dial, Joseph Loclear, Alex Locklear, Solomon Oxendine, A.J. Lowry, John A. Locklear, Silas Deas, James Lowry, Olline Oxendine, George Brayboy, William Sampson, Steven Carter, Peter Dial, Willy Jacobs, Quinn Gordan, Murdock Chavis." sign -- The Lost Colony of Roanoke.. seeking a Better lie forward.....................Simply put..they lied for cash and pride... 2.1910(January 24)Introduction of a Federal bill in the U.S.House of Representatives to change the tribes name from”Croatan to”Cherokee”at the request of the Croatans(lumbee) THE BILL DID NOT PASS 3. 1913(July 10)Introduction of another federal bill in the U.S. Senate to”change the tribes name from Indians of Robeson County to”Cherokee Indians”of Robeson County”by the Lumbee THE BILL DID NOT PASS 4. 1924 (March 20)Introduction of a bill again in the U.S. House to change the tribal name to”Cherokee”by the lumbee THE BILL DID NOT PASS 5. 1932(May 9).A federal bill was introduced in the U.S.Senate to”RECOGNIZE AND ENROLL the tribe as”Cherokee Indians”at the request of the lumbee(croatan)council

Steves's picture
Steves
Submitted by Steves on
well said !! sounds like the Lumbee scam.....exactly but long running First Croatan,Lost Colony lie having failed and sworn too....the Lumbee then swore to be Cherokee of Robeson county before congress...seeking some federal monies...its called lie switching,,,, PETITION OF CROATAN INDIANS.To the honorable the Congress of the United States,December 1887.For any moneys you may see fit for us. “The undersigned,your petitioners,a part of the Croatan Indians.SWEAR Descent from the Lost Colony of Roanoke”1887 signed by James Oxendine, Ashbury Oxendine, Zackriors Oxendine, J.J. Oxendine, Billy Locklear, Malakiah Locklear, Preston Locklear, John Ballard, Crolly Locklear, G.W. Locklear, Patrick Locklear, Luther Deas, Marcus Dial, Joseph Loclear, Alex Locklear, Solomon Oxendine, A.J. Lowry, John A. Locklear, Silas Deas, James Lowry, Olline Oxendine, George Brayboy, William Sampson, Steven Carter, Peter Dial, Willy Jacobs, Quinn Gordan, Murdock Chavis." sign -- The Lost Colony of Roanoke.. seeking a Better lie forward.....................Simply put..they lied for cash and pride... 2.1910(January 24)Introduction of a Federal bill in the U.S.House of Representatives to change the tribes name from”Croatan to”Cherokee”at the request of the Croatans(lumbee) THE BILL DID NOT PASS 3. 1913(July 10)Introduction of another federal bill in the U.S. Senate to”change the tribes name from Indians of Robeson County to”Cherokee Indians”of Robeson County”by the Lumbee THE BILL DID NOT PASS 4. 1924 (March 20)Introduction of a bill again in the U.S. House to change the tribal name to”Cherokee”by the lumbee THE BILL DID NOT PASS 5. 1932(May 9).A federal bill was introduced in the U.S.Senate to”RECOGNIZE AND ENROLL the tribe as”Cherokee Indians”at the request of the lumbee(croatan)council

Zucchero's picture
Zucchero
Submitted by Zucchero on
I was very impressed with the NAACP's statement how they don't have a race requirement to join their organization. That to me showed integrity and moral character. I doubt very much that organizations devoted to "White Power" would allow non whites to join their group. Sad but true.

Diane Pruitt
Diane Pruitt
Submitted by Diane Pruitt on
Really insightful view of personal and racial identity, cultural crossovers and misappropriation. I appreciate and concur with your viewpoint.

swrussel's picture
swrussel
Submitted by swrussel on
Most excellent work, and I have but one thing to add regarding what happens when folks of any ethnicity try to pour meaning into the empty vessel of "race." You can sometimes dope out what's going on by, in the immortal words of Deep Throat, "following the money." For African-Americans, there is the One Drop Rule, the rule that made Dolezal's claim credible for anyone with a smattering of history. One of the fine ironies of that history was in Plessy v. Ferguson, the "separate but equal" case. Homer Plessy was by "blood quantum" mostly white and lived as a white man. His offense at being ordered to use the "Negro" car was not that there was a "Negro" car but that he was banished to it. The One Drop Rule meant that the rapists' offspring with a slave woman was still a slave, no matter how many generations were raped. Indians have a reverse One Drop Rule. One drop of white or black blood has to mean you are no longer Indian so that when Indians are separated from their property, there are fewer persons entitled to share in the compensation, such that it is. Treaty obligations, likewise, are owed to a smaller population if Indians reproduce themselves out of existence in X generations, the value of X being as few as possible from the colonists' point of view and as many as possible from the point of view of Indians who marry out, as most Indians in fact do.

Chooj's picture
Chooj
Submitted by Chooj on
Ummm, Diana Schooling. In your comment you said "Northeast tribes never had black hair anyway, even before intermarriage....". Where the hell did you pick up that information? Do you think the people of the Northeastern Nations get their black hair through intermarriage with Europeans? Also, as you share your pedigree with the world--how can someone be 1/10th something and 9/10ths something else. Being a mixed-blood (as I am), you should be an expert at fractions.

Anna Shingleton
Anna Shingleton
Submitted by Anna Shingleton on
I have no problem with what Ms. Dolezal did. In a day and age where people can become who they want, when they want, and how they want. Why not let her live out her personal identity as she deems fit. I think what should be being looked at is whether she did her job to the best of her ability. Did she fight hard for the cause and did she make things better for those of us who are of a different color? Honestly, why would anyone question her being a victim of hate crimes? If you look and act colored you will experience the good and bad of being such. For the people who feel the need to imply she was not a victim of hate crimes all I can is: Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. (Albert Einstein) I feel this article is riddled with ignorance and judgmental attitude. As for Ms. Dolezal, I believe she broke the chains of being born into the role of “Master”. Rather than being looked at as part of the nameless, faceless force of oppression she chose to accomplish her dreams and passion for people of color in a way she felt would make the biggest difference towards creating change. She is not black but her culture is and I personally respect her efforts for attempting to help people of color despite the negative backlash of others.

Claire Kroenke
Claire Kroenke
Submitted by Claire Kroenke on
I like that there is a dialog about this. There has always been "Indian Princess Syndrome". In this context, where does this leave people like me- 1/2 blood, blue eyes, red hair, and freckles. My full-blooded dad fell in love with a beautiful German woman. And I am their kid. I have spent my entire life having my sincerity doubted by other Indians. I am 41 now and am gearing up for a career change- I intend to serve in an Indian Health Care environment. Everywhere I turn within the Indian community for suppor I am met with raised eyebrows. I used to make a joke that I should carry my tribal ID, my blood quantum, my certification letter, per cap check stubs and a photo of my dad with me at all times. Lately it hasn't been a joke. This also begs the question, how were black people so quick to accept her? I am a legitimate Indian (both DNA and culturally) and can't get the time of day from my people because of my skin color. I know the same bias exists in Black culture.

Nenaabi's picture
Nenaabi
Submitted by Nenaabi on
Gyasi Ross: I follow much of your work and I do agree with many of your points in this article, but I think you could have expressed your ideas with a little less divisive language. I also think it was disingenuous for you to equate what Rachel Dolezal did, which was obvious fraud, with the very deep and nuanced question of Native American identity in the 21st century. Come on, you and I both know full well as Native people that the question of Native identity is not as simple as you make it seem. This has been an issue for Native folks pretty much from the moment European colonizers figured out that it would be much easier to take our land if they just eliminated us by death or through loss of identification, ie, “assimilation” with whites (residential schools, anyone?). Given the historical context, our family histories as Native peoples are often full of stories of racial mixing, land allotment processes, residential schools, children taken from Indian homes and placed in white homes, etc. These histories are complex and they require that we think through the question of Native identity in ways that are far more constructive and respectful than those employed in your article. It's abundantly clear from the article that you have decided that some people have the right to claim their Native identity and others don't. Taking into consideration your apparent confidence in figuring out this immensely complex issue across Indian Country (and you and I both know darn well that we are NOT talking about the much simpler, superficial case of Rachel Dolezal's fraud), you should have no problem telling the readership where YOUR line is drawn. Do you need to be 51% Native to qualify according to you? What if you are only 1/16 Indian by blood but are enrolled in your tribe where you have strong and lasting ties and documented evidence of your family's heritage and the struggles your grandparents and other ancestors went through as a result of their Native identity? Is that person just one of these "hilarious" white dudes dancing at a Pow Wow to you? What about the "full blood" Native guy who grew up in suburbia and has ZERO connection or interest in connecting to his tribe or heritage? Please enlighten all of us on the criteria one must meet in order to avoid YOUR self-righteous, simplistic, and reductionist gaze. If you are going to write an article full of assumptions based on YOUR definition of Native American identity, then you OWE IT TO THE READERSHIP to tell us what that definition is. Journalistic integrity demands it. I am patiently awaiting your response………

Sammy7's picture
Sammy7
Submitted by Sammy7 on
Should an Indian writer who channels Andrew Jackson in his writings still be considered Indian?

WhiteManWanting's picture
WhiteManWanting
Submitted by WhiteManWanting on
Diana Schooling: I could be wrong, but I believe you missed the point Gyasi Ross was making, and that he never suggested that looks = genetics, and that if you don't have the looks (or even "enough" of them), you can't claim the genetics. In fact, Rachel Dolezal certainly proved that. The issue is authenticity, not appearance. No one (at least in their right mind) would question your "insides," given your genealogy.

WhiteManWanting's picture
WhiteManWanting
Submitted by WhiteManWanting on
Nenaabi: I too look forward to Gyasi Ross' response, because I simply did not read what you apparently read in the same words. The issue was "stealing" what is simply not one's own (in this case, blood lines). I see nothing in his article that draws (or even implies) a "line," past which a person does or does not have "enough" blood from a particular blood line. Your question, " What about the "full blood" Native guy who grew up in suburbia and has ZERO connection or interest in connecting to his tribe or heritage?" does not really relate to this article. If the "'full blood' Native guy" doesn't identify with his tribal origin, I personally find that sad, but entirely his right and decision to make. It doesn't change the genetics, and if he later decides to "identify with his tribal origin," (and more importantly, CLAIM his tribal origin) he's got the genetic credentials to do it. I can have all the interest in, and appreciation for Native cultures, beliefs, philosophies, traditions, etc., that I might want for myself. But I simply cannot claim membership. All I can hope for is acceptance as a welcome ally, to use Gyasi's term. And all I have the moral right to do is hope it comes after entirely honest and transparent presentation of myself.

604MIKMAQ's picture
604MIKMAQ
Submitted by 604MIKMAQ on
My name is Joseph and my mother is Mi'kmaq from the Eel Ground First Nations Reserve where my Grandmother and countless Uncles, Aunties and Cousins still live. My father is white. Irish and British. I am a Full Status Card carrying proud Native! I look white though. I roll my eyes hearing every other white person talk about how they are part native because I feel some look at me like that when I explain my heritage. I am Native first before anything and i'll teach my blonde hair blue eyed children the same traditions and stories that my elders taught me. I am a big fan of you Gyasi. Thanks for the read JM SMITH/MI'KMAQ FIRST NATIONS/EEL GROUND FIRST NATIONS/VANCOUVER, BC/ TURTLE ISLAND

604MIKMAQ's picture
604MIKMAQ
Submitted by 604MIKMAQ on
My name is Joseph and my mother is Mi'kmaq from the Eel Ground First Nations Reserve where my Grandmother and countless Uncles, Aunties and Cousins still live. My father is white. Irish and British. I am a Full Status Card carrying proud Native! I look white though. I roll my eyes hearing every other white person talk about how they are part native because I feel some look at me like that when I explain my heritage. I am Native first before anything and i'll teach my blonde hair blue eyed children the same traditions and stories that my elders taught me. I am a big fan of you Gyasi. Thanks for the read JM SMITH/MI'KMAQ FIRST NATIONS/EEL GROUND FIRST NATIONS/VANCOUVER, BC/ TURTLE ISLAND

Johnny Chan
Johnny Chan
Submitted by Johnny Chan on
And among the most preposterous of them all: the Israeli Askenazi (European-type Jewish) led government of Israel and their continued eviction and oppression (apartheid) of the native Semitic people (the Palestinian people), occupation of the native Semitic people's homeland and building illegal settlements (human shields).
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