Economy

June 28, 2014
By:
Michael Willis & John T. Plata

On June 3, 2014 the Internal Revenue Service issued Revenue Procedure 2014-35, Application of the General Welfare Exclusion to Indian Tribal Government Programs That Provide Benefits to Tribal Members.

May 27, 2014
By:
Steve Russell

Jim Manzi could almost be described as a conservative theologian. He made his fortune wrangling software, but now he’s a contributing editor of National Review, the brainchild of the late William F. Buckley that has become, as Buckley intended, the intellectual voice of American conservatism. Manzi’s also a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank that so far remains stubbornly tethered to fact-based reality while the Republican Party drifts farther from it every day.

Manzi’s bona fides as a conservative make him an outlier in the world of high tech. He seems to have resisted the liberal conspiracy that everybody knows twists the impressionable minds of American college students. His connection with National Review was probably begun with a job as research assistant to Mr. Buckley.

All of this is context to Manzi’s influential essay in the latest issue of National Affairs, titled “The New American System.” While those on the left attribute American riches to the theft of Indian land and African labor at a time when land and labor were the twin pillars of wealth creation, Manzi credits “an almost ruthless pragmatism” in public policy. Almost?

Students of history understand that the left and right narratives are both correct to the extent neither crowds out the other, and this is where Manzi’s stubborn tether to fact-based reality leads him to advocate “decisive government investments in infrastructure, human capital, and new technologies.”

Those of us who have always understood that government cash seeded steamboats, canals, railroads, civil aviation, interstate highways, the Internet—the list could go on---are not surprised.

Those of us who dream of tribal governments functioning as governments rather than mere social clubs that give voice to legitimate historical grievances understand that those investments are no less necessary on Indian land, whether the capital is acquired from outside investment or by taxing what little we have to tax.

Sovereignty cannot be exercised from a condition of dependence, and the conservative thinker Jim Manzi points the way to independence of Indian nations as much as the way forward for the United States at a time when the economy has been stagnating.

Let’s look at Manzi’s governmental desiderata from the perspective of both colonial and tribal governments, starting with human capital.

For the US government, the major issue begins with the grief that began, like most US economic grief, in what we call the Reagan Revolution, the vast redistribution of wealth in the opposite direction of what FDR redistributed in the New Deal.

Student aid has moved inexorably from scholarships and grants to loans. By the time Mr. Obama became POTUS, the privatization of student loans had proceeded to the complete absurdity that banks were allowed to charge for being middlemen in the transaction while the government still guaranteed the loans. Gov. Romney, had he been elected, promised to reinstate what President Obama had changed in the interest of getting more money to more students at lower rates. I never heard Romney explain why this would be good public policy beyond the GOP bromide that the private sector can do anything and the public sector can’t do anything, a position belied by the historical account in Jim Manzi’s essay.

The upshot of this turn to privatized loans is a debt bubble with serious economic consequences for us all.

One consequence is the slow recovery of the housing market, once driven by first time buyers, who now graduate with too much debt to qualify for a mortgage.

Another is the securitization of student loans in the same manner that mortgages were securitized before the great crash in 2008, because the Dodd-Frank reforms to prevent it have been watered down and tied up in the rulemaking process by the investment banks, who don’t do student loans but do have an interest in all kinds of derivative securities.

I met another consequence of student aid policy in the last two weeks, when I had occasion to chat with three medical students who were interning under doctors I was visiting. They all knew about the impending shortage of family practice docs because Obamacare allows people to seek medical care they could not afford when uninsured. Two of the three would enter family practice if they could, but felt they needed the higher income of specialization to deal with their student loan debt.

May 03, 2014
By:
Peter d'Errico

Jonathan Schell died recently.

October 15, 2013
By:
Lance Morgan & Gabriel S. Galanda

The New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) has provided a vital spark to infrastructure and economic development projects across Indian country.

September 08, 2013
By:
Peter d'Errico

On August 9, 2013, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon issued a statement for International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples.

May 24, 2013
By:
Ralph Forquera and Polly Olsen

Urban Indians are not new to the urban scene, as New York Times reporter Timothy Williams suggested in his article, "Quietly, Indians Reshape Cities and Res

April 24, 2013
By:
Charles Kader

The recent legal decision in the case of King Mountain Tobacco v. the State of Washington has become quite the topic in reservation business conversation.

April 21, 2013
By:
Walter Lamar

The virtual currency, bitcoin, recently gained attention as its trading value topped $140 US per coin on April 2.

January 03, 2013
By:
Winona LaDuke

As Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence enters her fourth week on a hunger strike outside the Canadian parliament, thousands of protesters in Los Angeles, London, Minneapolis and New York City, voice their support.

December 10, 2012
By:
Dave Staddon

Tribal economic development is a complex issue, but important to the future development of tribal economies. Tribes get a wide variety of projects pitched to them. And not all of them are potentially beneficial.

October 06, 2012
By:
Steve Russell

Tribal governments that disdain being “domestic, dependent nations” should prepare two budgets, similar to the “shadow governments” that opposition parties compose in a parliamentary system.

October 04, 2012
By:
Fred Wszolek

In 2004, largely under the mainstream media radar, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or Board) dispossessed Native Americans. But this time, it was not their lands that were being taken away—it was their sovereignty.

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