Education

July 28, 2014
By:
Charles M. Roessel and Ronald Thorpe

In his recent visit to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, President Obama announced an ambitious plan to fulfill the promise of a brighter future for children who grow up in often remote and impoverished Native communities.

July 27, 2014
By:
Carla Mann

President Obama recently visited the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota where he presented a series of Indian Education proposals intended to reform the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE).

June 25, 2014
By:
Nick Estes

Standing in a parking lot across the street from the 2014 Chamberlain High School commencement ceremony last Sunday, singers, supporters (Native and non-Native), students, and families crowded outside the National Guard Armory to

June 17, 2014
By:
Renee Holt

Dedicating this song ‘Commencement Day’ from the Blue Scholars of Seattle to “the class of two thousand whatever” throughout Indian country and all “the teachers who are underpaid” and love their students enough to keep on teaching.

June 12, 2014
By:
Jennie Stockle

On May 19, I went to the Oklahoma Capitol Building to present Governor Mary Fallin with an 8,000 signature and 90 plus page petition I created for Eradicating Offensive Native Mascotry (EONM), a group of Native American parents and allies along with RH Reality Check, a daily publication providing

June 07, 2014
By:
Julianne Jennings

Morgan James Peters, 46, professionally known as "Mwalim DaPhunkee Professor," is a Mashpee Wampanoag, multifaceted performing artist, writer, media artist and educator, who swept the 2010 Jazz category with his album The Liberation Sessions winning the ‘Best Jazz Male’ as well as ‘Best

April 16, 2014
By:
Jack Duran

After being ignored for nearly six decades the Grindstone Indian Rancheria, located in Glenn County, California, will receive its own representative on the Stony Creek Joint Unified School District Board of Education in Elk Creek, California.

March 07, 2014
By:
Dave Courchene

We, the First Peoples, are the roots of this land. As the original free and independent nations of Turtle Island, we honour our sacred traditions, which were given to us by our Great Creator. We recognize that our first step must be to show our appreciation and gratitude towards Meymeynosh—the Earth herself. Being the roots of this land comes with the responsibility of leadership in educating our children.

When we truly reflect on the present education system as it is delivered to the youth, we must return to the original intent of education itself—and see that we have failed our children in providing the best education possible.

We pride ourselves in that we live in an advanced society because of our education system, yet we have not been able to find more peaceful resolutions to our differences, and we continue to challenge nature’s authority.

In the English dictionary, education is defined as “to develop [a child] mentally, morally or aesthetically, especially by instruction.”

The education system has failed First Nations people because it does not tell the truth of the history of our people. It does not share the stories of the roots of the original people of this land who have a knowledge and understanding, particularly in how to have a respectful relationship with Meymeynosh herself.

RELATED: First Nations Call Federal Education Act a Bust 

March 05, 2014
By:
Steve Russell

This was to be a weekend of data entry for my income taxes. TurboTax wants to triple what they charge to file Schedules C and D, and I have to either pay up or enter a lot of stuff for myself the first year that any of the programs will do for you in subsequent years. I got interrupted when a big envelope showed up at my door.

From the return address, I quickly figured out what was inside and was ripping it open like my five-year-old twin grandkids did their birthday presents last week: Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Universities: 2012.

I opened the booklet inside to distribution by “race and ethnicity” and started reading.

African-Americans have increased their Ph.D.s 87 percent in the past 20 years, which sounds great until you see they are now getting 6.3 percent of the degrees awarded, 2,079, while representing 13.1 percent of the US population.

Hispanics have doubled their numbers of Ph.D.s in the past 20 years, which sounds all right until you see they are now getting 6.5 percent of the degrees awarded, 2,141, while representing 16.9 percent of the U.S. population.

Then came the sentence in the report that told me what I didn’t want to hear: “The number of American Indian or Alaska Native doctorate recipients fell to its lowest point of the past 20 years.” In numbers, that’s 102 doctorates or well under one-half of one percent awarded to a group representing (allegedly) 1.2 percent of the population.

I confess this hurt more back when I was in the business of producing Ph.D.s, because it felt like a personal failure to look under every rock for potential Indian candidates. But it still hurts enough that I take on the job of convincing others that this is bad news to hear that while other minorities are making too little progress, we are making none.

The whole idea of “progress” is problematic to public opinion in great chunks of Indian country. You can’t entertain “progress” without value judgments about where you are right now and where you are going and those value judgments, the argument goes, contain a profound disrespect for “tradition” and are a symptom of “assimilation,” the death of a culture. Others of us think that assimilation is the life of a culture because it’s not a one-way street.

When two cultures interact, neither remains the same. To think that one must totally disappear is to apprehend the disappearing one as profoundly inferior. The Indian fighters, of course, seldom verbalize our inferiority as a reason for our academic underperformance. They let the numbers speak for themselves.

If we address the dismal numbers, we either blame the racists or we point to the numbers with pride, as evidence of successful resistance to the colonial enterprise that challenges us to assimilate or die.

Many of my white students were greatly concerned with this thing called “globalization,” which means to them that their competition is not their neighbors but other kids halfway around the world that are multilingual, just as smart, and way hungrier.

Indians, of course, shall never go hungry, and the commods shall arrive as long as the rivers shall run. Would it be tacky to point out that the rivers are drying up, and the solutions to that problem are going to require advanced education in many fields, not the least of which is political science?

Right now, there’s a woman in my tribe coming out of an environmental science Ph.D. program. She serves on the tribal council and is running for chief. I’m not sure yet how I feel about that, but I am sure what the knowledge represented by that Ph.D. means. It means that she’ll be better fixed to do a good job if she wins and she’ll have plenty of opportunities to do important things for the tribe if she loses.

In my field, sometimes people will get snarky with a college student in the family, asking, “Does the world really need another lawyer?” Actually, Indian communities are hardly over lawyered, but that’s not the point. That degree is evidence that you know a lot of stuff that is going to come in handy for you and yours if you never set foot in a courthouse.

November 02, 2013
By:
Chelsea Vowel

Much ado is made of our divisions and differences, and this is so successful because the narrative of our sameness is foundational to colonial policies.

October 30, 2013
By:
Walter Lamar

College education can be the difference between meandering into the world of work or roaring into a career to make a difference for family and the Native community.

September 24, 2013
By:
Mike Taylor

Dear President Stephen D. Nadauld, Dixie State University:

September 09, 2013
By:
Dwanna L. Robertson

I love teaching. I love how students are open to new information and give critical thought about contemporary social issues. Mostly, I teach about social injustices that accompany the experience of being racialized (labeled) as not-white.

September 01, 2013
By:
The Daily Take, The Thom Hartmann Program

A new poll released yesterday by Public Policy Polling finds that Louisiana Republican Governor Bobby Jindal is the least popular Republican governor in the country, and second most unpopular governor in the U.S. overall.

Pages