History

March 31, 2016
By:
Steven Newcomb

There is a movement underway to erect a statue in honor of Vasco Nunez de Balboa in Balboa Park, in that part of the Kumeyaay Nation territory commonly called “San Diego.” San Diego Union Tribune columnist Logan Jenkins calls attention to the campaign to create a bronze statue for Balboa in his M

March 28, 2016
By:
Dina Gilio-Whitaker

The social revolution of the 1960’s and 70’s was a time of positive change for American Indian people and America in general.

March 21, 2016
By:
Steve Russell

History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme.

The remark above is attributed to Mark Twain without any evidence. Who said it remains a mystery, but we are living it in the 2016 elections.

March 15, 2016
By:
Steven Newcomb

The March 3, 2016 murder of Indigenous leader Berta Cáceres in Honduras reminded me of John Bodley’s book Victims of Progress (1982).

March 09, 2016
By:
Jennifer Falcon

March 12 marks the 44th Anniversary of an important part of the Indian Civil Rights Movement, when 12 Indian employees at the Bureau of Indians Affairs’ Plant Management Engineering Center filed a formal complaint against the bureau stating discriminatory practices in training, hiring and promoti

March 05, 2016
By:
Mālia Kahaleʻinia Chun

On January 17, 1893, a group of American sugar barons and plantation owners, backed by the United States military, overthrew Queen Lili’uokalani of the Kingdom of Hawai’i and imprisoned her in her own palace. The coup led to the dissolving of the Kingdom and its illegal annexation by the U.S.

February 22, 2016
By:
Alice Kehoe

In a column written for Indian Country Today Media Network, Alvin Manitopyes commented on the film, The Revenant. He concluded on a very false note: that First Nations “women were perceived as p

February 20, 2016
By:
Harlan McKosato

Where do we gain our moral conscious? Where do we acquire our moral guide? I bring these questions up to ask two other questions: Why are so many Native people still absorbed with colonization and decolonization in 2016?

February 17, 2016
By:
David Wilkins

Justice Antonia Scalia was one of the most rabidly anti-Native justices—closely aligned with former Chief Justice William Rehnquist—ever to serve on the High Court. His passing creates a vacancy on the influential court that will have lasting consequences.

February 13, 2016
By:
JaNae Collins

In the bitter cold month of December, 1890 earsplitting gunfire, cannon-like blasts from Hotchkiss guns, and tortured screams could be heard from a people that would leave a soul wound on the ground and on the spirits for generations to come.

February 13, 2016
By:
Cynthia Coleman Emery

The US Supreme Court has declined to weigh in on a lower court ruling that will, in effect, allow ancient bones to be returned to American Indians in California.

February 04, 2016
By:
Charles Kader

As I get older the words of my elders ring louder and longer in my mind. “We are an original people. We have always been here. We will survive.” Such messages are proven to me daily.

February 03, 2016
By:
Laura Waterman Wittstock

The perverse history of governmental-Lakota/Dakota relations took a more sinister turn when the Hiawatha Insane Asylum was built 10 years after Wounded Knee, December 29, 1890. It operated for over 30 years before it was torn down.

January 22, 2016
By:
Steven Newcomb

Much of what we take to be physically true is metaphorically true.

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