History

September 03, 2013
By:
Steven Newcomb

Ever notice how some dominant society people tend to talk about the past, particularly when it comes to Indian history? “Well that was a long time ago,” some will dismissively say. “You can’t turn back the clock,” is another typical phrase. And then there is this gem: “What’s past is past.”

September 01, 2013
By:
The Daily Take, The Thom Hartmann Program

A new poll released yesterday by Public Policy Polling finds that Louisiana Republican Governor Bobby Jindal is the least popular Republican governor in the country, and second most unpopular governor in the U.S. overall.

August 30, 2013
By:
Steve Russell

In a series of columns keying on Martin Luther King’s iconic “I Have a Dream” speech, I’ve asked Indians to dream.

August 28, 2013
By:
Steve Russell

Martin Luther King, Jr. famously told the nation, “I have a dream.” Less famously, he said on April 3, 1968: “Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain.

August 27, 2013
By:
Steven Newcomb

A number of fundamental assumptions inform my writing.

August 26, 2013
By:
Steve Russell

In my previous column leading up to August 28, the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, I sketched a prosperous nation

August 24, 2013
By:
Steven Newcomb

On August 9, a Haudenosaunee delegation commemorated the 400th year of the Two Row Wampum.

August 23, 2013
By:
Julianne Jennings

In October, 1675 (Just five months after the start of the King Philip’s War, 1675-1676) some 500 Nipmucks from what is now South Natick were forcibly removed to Deer Island, a barren strip of land off Boston Harbor, as a concentration camp for Indians (later it would become a holding area for Iri

August 20, 2013
By:
Steve Russell

Anniversaries matter in the short run as memory markers and in the long run they become traditions. The year 1963 was the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, and it was used by activists of the time to take another step toward emancipation on the economic front.

August 10, 2013
By:
Jay Daniels

There is a story about the Prophet Samuel rebuking King David for committing adultery with Bathsheba. He told of a man who owned many sheep, but when he needed one, he stole his neighbor's one sheep.

August 09, 2013
By:
Darren Bonaparte

As a Mohawk historian who uses wampum belts to tell our story, I have always loved the Two Row Wampum Belt and its metaphor of the native canoe and European ship sailing side by side down the river of life.

August 07, 2013
By:
Peter d'Errico

The phrase "dirty war" came into use during the 1970s and 1980s to describe the campaign of state terrorism in Argentina after a dictatorship overthrew the elected government of Juan Peron. Anyone associated with socialism or Peronism was a target for kidnapping, torture, and "disappearance."

August 06, 2013
By:
Steven Newcomb

This article is written in anticipation of the U.S. Department of State’s plan to convene a “listening session” this fall with American Indian leaders. The meeting, which will be held at the U.S. Department of the Interior Building in Washington, will focus on two matters.

August 03, 2013
By:
Steven Newcomb

This past May, I went to the Archives of the Indies in Seville, Spain to see the original documents issued by Pope Alexander VI in 1493, and to see the original Requerimiento (‘the Requirement’) issued by the Spanish crown government in 1513, 500 years ago this year.

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