(AP)

Yellowstone's 'Rock Star' Wolf Shot and Killed

ICTMN Staff
12/11/12

The New York Times reported that Yellowstone National Park's most famous and beloved wolf, known as 832F to researchers, was shot and killed last week. Daniel Stahler, a project director for Yellowston's wolf program, said that the wolf's $4,000 collar with GPS tracking will be returned. Data from the collar showed that her pack rarely strayed from Yellowstone.

Hunting season in the area this year has been controversial. Many popular wolves have been killed just outside Yellowstone in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

Wolf hunts, which some ranchers and hunters say reduce attacks on livestock and protect big game, are sanctioned by recent federal and state rules applying to the northern Rockies, though they have been fiercely opposed. The wolf population has rebounded since they were reintroduced in the mid-1990s to counter their extirpation a few years earlier.

"She is the most famous wolf in the world,” Jimmy Jones, a wildlife photographer whose portrait of 832F appears in the current issue of the magazine American Scientist, told the Times.

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
Sad news. Sorry for your loss. Some idiots are just plain blood thirsty! And it's not very likely to stop any time soon.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
I visited a Native American museum once and there was a display there, that had a scenic picture of the American North West. In front was a bench were you sat down and looked at the amazing view of Mother Nature. As I sat there I got a peaceful feeling of how it once was on this wonderful Planet. So beautiful and sublime, I almost cried just the thought of it. On the bottom of the Picture was a inscription that read " Indigenous native people have lived here in harmony with nature for thousands and thousands of years". Today I cry for 832F she was apart of us........ ( Navajo,Apache).

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
I pray that people wake up and understand that what ranchers and hunters want is only in their own interests. We need to live WITH all other life on this planet and not just kill whatever we don't like. If this concept does not change the only thing that will be left on this rock will be what could hide long enough for us to kill ourselves or got feed up out enough to kill us.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
It's sad to see something so beautiful to get killed, why would anybody want to kill an animal that did nothing wrong, the animals have much freedom as people do, they live, they eat, and they sleep, I live in between two cities and my backyard is pretty big, along with the field in the back and we have coyote's I see them sometimes just to come out and find food for their families. They don't bother me or my two little dogs that I have, therefore I have no reason to shoot an animal who's wondering around to just look for food, or just for kicks, would like to find the person and ask him/her why? Thank you Michele Highley Ferndal, WA, charter college, criminal justice

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
Was it a legal hunt? If so, nothing to do here. Big game hunting is a great conservation tool and the money raised (literally billions) will continue to help the animals that are hunted (including wolves). Regulations around big game hunting have helped recover such species as white tail deer and elk, with it's careful and scientific approach to maintaining the proper carrying capacity of animals in a given land area. And now wolves, having made a tremendous comeback, get to join the ranks. Congrats to the wolves! Side note: Although it would be more classy to not kill the animals that have been collared for research (since now more money must be spent to collar another animal if they want to continue the research.)

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
jerks

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
may the grandmother and grandfather ancestors guide this beautiful animal to his next life. may he find peace to join his brothers and sisters that have passed over to play and howl once again. annie

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
Some people are just unfeeling, uneducated idiots.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
It makes me sad that some hunters have no respect for the area that the wolves were in and just because they strayed from the park, these hunters find it necessary to kill.

MyLadyK's picture
MyLadyK
Submitted by MyLadyK on
Not so many years ago, elk were reintroduced to Western North Carolina. The first year, many calves were killed by black bear due to the lack of knowledge by their mothers. The second year, fewer calves died as the mothers learned the ways to protect their young ones. Now, the herd has grown from less than 30 to over 125. It takes a bit of time for the wolves' prey animals to learn from them, but they will learn. The arguement of protecting big game is illogical for this reason. Protecting domesticated livestock is another matter. These animals have been "dumbed down" for generations. Live stock have caretakers who have a responsibility to the animal and to their own financial bottomline. We must know the facts of this tragedy before we can make an informed decision on it's significance.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
I have Gray eyes, and when I was a child my dad would tell me I was part wolf. He would always tell me to eat good, because he didn't want to find me out chasing the cow in the middle of the night because I was hungry. That has always stuck with me. I read this and I think about my dad, about the wolf, and was she chasing the cow?

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
it amazes me that many these ranchers are grazing on fedral land and they want the wildlife removed. there is a huge fight going on about wild horses also. how about if they have do what many other farmers and ranchers do and buy land. this has been going on for generations. they have gotten so comfortable they think they own it

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
After reading all of the posts here, I have to add my two cents worth. Animals die from five main causes: old age, disease/starvation, accident, predation or hunting. As long as there are no large organized hunts, (such as bounty hunts) hunting will not impact the population of a species; on the other hand, the land can only sustain a limited number of each animal species and once that limit is realized, animals will begin to die from one of the five causes that I listed above and (in my opinion) hunting is usually the most humane and quickest way for an animal to die (followed closely by predation and accidents). The author of this story specifically targeted people such as yourselves who have no real idea what the balance of nature is all about in order to inflame and incite you. If you do not want ranchers to be able to kill predators in order to protect their herds, then establish a fund to pay them for their losses and then change the law to make it illegal for him to kill in order to protect the livestock (set up the fund first!) As for hunters, they provide a much needed service to the wildlife that they harvest (and if you have ever seen the aftermath of a huge die-off because of starvation or disease then you will understand this statement). The wolf was killed legally in accordance with the law so congratulations to a successful hunter.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
shame on people who think they can destroy what ever they want when ever they want....

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
Everone is sorry for the lost of this wolf. The very same people who despise this lost of life will think nothing of a woman killing a human child by abortion.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
I say they release some of these wolves in states like California and New York and see how they respond! The locals in these states were happy with their thriving wildlife populations until the wolf was reintroduced!! I say everyone who visits yellowstone should take a wolf home with them.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
The local wildlife has enough predators to worry about. Grizzleys, Black Bear and mountain lions also compete with these wolves for food.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
The wolves need to be controlled. Period. They are spreading like wildfire and wreaking havoc in the Montana/Wyoming/Idaho region; they need to be controlled. I swear people anthropomorphize wolves like no other. Maybe you would feel differently after hearing dogs and moose calves being disemboweled and eaten alive at night not even a mile from you. These things are top predators and people didn't have the foresight to see how devastating their reintroduction would be.
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