The Ballad of Ira Hayes: Remembering a Reluctant Hero

ICTMN Staff
5/26/13

Ira Hamilton Hayes was a Pima Indian from the Gila River Reservation who volunteered to fight as a U.S. Marine in World War II. He gained fame in the Pacific campaign when he, along with four fellow Marines and one Sailor, raised the U.S. flag over Iwo Jima while the battle still raged for that strategically vital rock in the middle of the ocean. The act of raising the flag was captured by AP photographer Joe Rosenthal and has became one of the most iconic war images ever. The resulting fame took a heavy toll on Hayes.

In the inimitable voice and words of Johnny Cash....

Courtesy of the United States Marine Corps:

CORPORAL IRA HAMILTON HAYES, USMCR (DECEASED)

Ira Hamilton Hayes, participant in the famous flag raising on Iwo Jima, was a Pima Indian, born at Sacaton, Arizona, on 12 January 1923. In 1932, the family moved a few miles southward to Bapchule. Both Sacaton and Bapchule are located within the boundaries of the Gila River Indian Reservation in south central Arizona. Hayes left high school after completing two years of study. He served in the Civilian Conservation Corps in May and June of 1942, and then  went to work as a carpenter. 

On 26 August 1942, Ira Hayes enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve at Phoenix for the duration of the National Emergency. Following boot camp at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot at San Diego, Hayes was assigned to the Parachute Training School at Camp Gillespie, Marine Corps Base, San Diego. Graduated one month later, the Arizonan was qualified as a parachutist on 30 November and promoted to private first class the next day. On 2 December, he joined Company B, 3d Parachute Battalion, Divisional Special Troops, 3d Marine Division, at Camp Elliott, California, with which he sailed for Noumea, New Caledonia, on 14 March 1943.

In April, Hayes' unit was redesignated Company K, 3d Parachute Battalion, 1st Marine Parachute Regiment. In October Hayes sailed for Vella Lavella, arriving on the 14th. Here, he took part in the campaign and occupation of that island until 3 December when he moved north to Bougainville, arriving on the 4th. The campaign there was already underway, but the parachutists had a full share of fighting before they left on 15 January 1944.

Hayes was ordered to return to the United States where he landed at San Diego on 14 February 1944, after slightly more than 11 months overseas and two campaigns. The parachute units were disbanded in February, and Hayes was transferred to Company E, 2d Battalion, 28th Marines, of the 5th Marine Division, then at Camp Pendleton, California.

In September, Hayes sailed with his company for Hawaii for more training. He sailed from Hawaii in January en route to Iwo Jima where he landed on D-day (19 February 1945) and remained during the fighting until 26 March. Then he embarked for Hawaii where he boarded a plane for the U.S. on 15 April. On the 19th, he joined Company C, 1st Headquarters Battalion, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington, D.C.

On 10 May, Hayes, Private First Class Gagnon, Pharmacist's Mate Second Class Bradley, and Marine Technical Sergeant Keyes Beech, a combat correspondent, left on the bond selling tour. In Chicago, Hayes received orders directing his return to the 28th Marines. He arrived at Hilo, Hawaii, and rejoined Company E of the 29th on 28 May. Three weeks later, on 19 June, he was promoted to corporal.

With the end of the war, Corporal Hayes and his company left Hilo and landed at Sasebo, Japan, on 22 September to participate in the occupation of Japan. On 25 October, Corporal Hayes boarded his eleventh and last ship to return to his homeland for the third time. Landing at San Francisco on 9 November, he was honorably discharged on 1 December.

Corporal Hayes was awarded a Letter of Commendation with Commendation Ribbon by the Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, Lieutenant General Roy S. Geiger, for his "meritorious and efficient performance of duty while serving with a Marine infantry battalion during operations against the enemy on Vella Lavella and Bougainville, British Solomon Islands, from 15 August to 15 December 1943, and on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, from 19 February to 27 March 1945."

The list of the Corporal's decorations and medals includes the Commendation Ribbon with "V" combat device, Presidential Unit Citation with one star (for Iwo Jima), Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with four stars (for Vella Lavella, Bougainville, Consolidation of the Northern Solomons, and Iwo Jima), American Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal.

The former Marine died at Bapchule on 24 January 1955. He was buried on 2 February 1955 at Arlington National Cemetery, in Section 34, Plot 479A.

Read more:

Ira Hayes, an American hero 

An Iwo Jima Story You May Not Have Heard

 

You need to be logged in in order to post comments
Please use the log in option at the bottom of this page

POST A COMMENT

Comments

Hans Ragnar Mathisen's picture
Hans Ragnar Mathisen
Submitted by Hans Ragnar Mathisen on
I have heard a song/ballad by Peter LaFarge (Hopi), with many songs on a Folkways LP, including one about Ira Hayes.

Jackie Rozell's picture
Jackie Rozell
Submitted by Jackie Rozell on
Yet when the monument Three Soldiers was placed on the Mall in DC, it depicted a Black, White and Hispanic soldier. When questioned about why a Native American was not included, the reply was that the Hispanic also represented Native Americans. Really? Seriously? After Ira Hayes? After Windtalkers turned the tide in two World Wars? Okay.

meggan braley's picture
meggan braley
Submitted by meggan braley on
I had the honor of meeting Ira in Cumberland, Md. at Memorial Hospital. My mom worked there, and I volunteered at times to run the switch board. One day, while on the board, Ira came in with a fellow marine, who was ill and was hospitalized for several days. Ira spent his time visiting his buddy, or sitting in the lobby. I gave him magazines and chatted with him when I could.I was only a teenager, but I respected Ira for his love of his buddy, and his country. I have followed his career closely, as he toured all over the states selling war bonds, and when he returned home. May the great spirit always be by his side. I plan on visiting him once more at Arlingon site with my prayers. I still cherish the little feather he gave me before he left the hospital.

AC Smith's picture
AC Smith
Submitted by AC Smith on
The original version of "Ballad of Ira Hayes", covered by many including Cash and Townes van Zandt, was by a folk singer named Peter LaFarge. I commend him to your attention.
4