AP
Archaeologists estimate that Serpent Mound dates back to 1000 to 1500 A.D. (AP)

Crazy Theories Threaten Serpent Mound, Demean Native Heritage

Mary Annette Pember
6/6/13

Is it home to a mine for spaceship fuel? Could it be a portal to another dimension, ready to be activated? Is it a place of hidden paranormal powers? Was it a safe spot to be when the 2012 Mayan prophecy predicted the end of the world? Is it an ancient indigenous homage to the summer and winter solstice?

Officially Serpent Mound is the largest surviving prehistoric effigy mound in the world, but in this stranger-­than-fiction story, there are ardent supporters for all of the claims listed above, and many more.

According to the Ohio Historical Society, the organization that manages the site in rural in southern Ohio, the mound is over 1,300 feet long, and clearly resembles an uncoiling serpent. Their website says the original purpose of the mound is unknown but was probably built by people from the Fort Ancient culture who lived in the area from 1000 to 1500 A.D. Bradley Lepper, archaeologist for the society, reports that the head of Serpent Mound appears to align with the rising sun during the summer solstice, and since the nearby Newark Earthworks have detailed astronomical alignments built into them, it is reasonable to assume that Serpent Mound does as well. Generations of researchers agree with that theory, but the intent of those who built the serpent remains a mystery. Lepper posits that Serpent Mound may have been a shrine to a spiritual power.

The mound is on the National Register of Historic Places and is being considered as a U.S. nominee to the UNESCO World Heritage sites. According to Glenna J. Wallace, chief of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, the Shawnee consider Serpent Mound a sacred site. The Eastern Shawnee were originally from Ohio but left the area along with several other tribes as part of the federal Indian Removal Act of 1830. Nine tribes removed from Ohio settled on reservations in Oklahoma; by about 1850, most had officially been “removed.” Today, there are no federally recognized tribes in Ohio. “Although we don’t claim that we built Serpent Mound, historically we respected and protected the various mounds and earthworks in Ohio,” says Wallace.

In recent years, Serpent Mound has become a mecca for New Agers. A story in the The Columbus Dispatch last year offered a glimpse into that world. The headline for the story declared, vandals admit muffin-crystal-thingie assault at serpent mound. According to the story, a group of people from the organization Unite the Collective posted a video showing people burying “what may be” hundreds of small muffin-shaped devices called orgonites in the mounds, hoping they were “[lifting] the vibration of the earth so we can all rise together.” They describe themselves as Light Warriors.

Orgonites are homemade objects composed of resin and bits of metal and crystal. A number of websites claim orgonites draw in negative energy and emit positive energy. In the 1930s, the controversial Austrian inventor Wilhelm Reich “discovered” orgone; he claimed it was the life energy that fueled all living things. He created and sold “orgone accumulators” he claimed could concentrate and direct this life energy. There were a few skeptics: In 1954, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared orgone accumulators and “orgonomy”—the study of orgone—to be a sham, and Reich was tried for making false and misleading claims. He was sentenced to two years in jail, and the Food and Drug Administration ordered all accumulators rented or owned by him destroyed. Despite that bit of unpleasantness, orgonomy continues to have a devoted following.

The burying of those “crystal thingies” was just the latest in a long list of unusual New Age activities at Serpent Mound. Authorities from the Ohio State Historical Society have been tolerant of these doings so long as no damage has been done to the mound. The activities of the self-described light warriors, however, went too far. According to the Courier piece, Unite the Collective placed a video on YouTube that showed several people running and jumping over the mounds, and declared in the video (entitled “Serpent Mound Reactivation 2012”) that they spent several days planting orgonites in Serpent Mound in order to “reactivate” it. The link to the YouTube video has since been taken down from the Unite the Collective website.

The New Age fascination with the mounds dates back to the so-called Harmonic Convergence in 1987. (AP)

After seeing the video, the Ohio State Historical Society began working with the Adams County Sheriff’s department to seek the arrest and prosecution of the vandals. “We take any vandalism and desecration of historic sites extremely seriously,” said Burt Logon, executive director of the Historical Society in an interview with the Dispatch. “We are appalled at the irresponsible behavior and deliberate vandalism. Ohio’s history must be preserved and protected for future generations.”

In the video, the light warriors reportedly claimed to have buried hundreds of orgonites in the mound. So far, however, authorities have found only a few. According to Lepper, the society is planning to use a police dog to locate the remaining orgonites. “Our hope is that prosecuting these [vandals] will prevent others from doing these sorts of activities,” he said.

According to Serpent Mound gift-shop manager Megan McCane, burying or placing items in and around the mound has gone on for quite some time. Volunteers and workers routinely remove items placed in the mound. To discourage the burial of objects, workers have designated a place nearby for people to leave such offerings.

Lepper says various New Age ceremonies began in earnest at Serpent Mound around the time of the Harmonic Convergence in August 1987. Believers all over the world marked that event by gathering, chanting and meditating at various sites deemed powerful. “Thousands of people came to Serpent Mound during the convergence,” Lepper recalls.

Since then, numerous New Age ceremonies, gatherings and festivals have become popular events at Serpent Mound.

An Alien Gas Station?
Some of the extreme interpretations about why the mounds were built are supported by such unlikely sources as the History Channel, which ran a series, Ancient Aliens, that purports to prove extraterrestrial beings inhabited or visited Earth in ancient times. In 2011, the show featured Serpent Mound and offered evidence that allegedly shows that the site was a landing area for aliens, who frequently visited Serpent Mound to mine iridium, a rare element, to fuel their ships.

The show’s producers conducted numerous interviews with local experts as well as supporters of various New Age interpretations of the mounds, including Lepper, who now regrets participating. “The producers spent a long time interviewing me, but in the actual show they feature a seconds-long quote in which I say, ‘Serpent Mound must have been special,’ then they jump to another source saying that the mound was built by aliens.”

Local owner of the House of Phacops Museum Tom Johnson was presented in the show as an expert on both Serpent Mound and local Native people. In his interview, he says, “the Shawnee are convinced that space travelers are using Serpent Mound as a marker.”

The House of Phacops is a rock shop that offers trilobites [a local fossil] minerals and crystals for sale. Johnson is a former factory worker from Michigan, a trilobite enthusiast and an advocate for New Age activities at Serpent Mound. According to one of the Museum’s brochures, he also offers information about local travel to sacred places, including Serpent Mound. A local citizen’s organization, “Friends of Serpent Mound,” coordinates a number of events popular among New Age followers such as spring equinox and summer solstice celebrations. Events feature drumming, sweat lodges, healing ceremonies as well as presentations by authors such as Ross Hamilton who wrote The Mystery of Serpent Mound: In Search of the Alphabet of the Gods. According to the publisher’s online information, the book draws on historical, linguistic, archaeological, and occult sources in describing the secret knowledge hidden in the mound.

Sacred Destinations, a website dedicated to showcasing sacred places for “spiritual pilgrimage” features Serpent Mound among its more than 1,200 such sites. According to the website’s description, “Some New Age practitioners have suggested that Serpent Mound is patterned on the Little Dipper constellation, which could indicate a cosmic energy flow between heaven and earth. Others have analyzed the mounds (along with others in the area) for ley lines, which are believed to conduct healing energy between ancient sacred sites. New Age groups and individuals often use the site for meditation.”

Sea: New Agers are cribbing from a sci-fi movie. (Mary Annette Pember)

A local healer who calls himself “Three Eagles” and claims Cherokee heritage frequently participates in New Age gatherings at the mound. Three Eagles, who took the name after seeing three eagles in one day, cuts negative energy away from people by making cutting motions close to the body with a large bowie knife. He claims to have been taught the skill by another man trained in Tibetan healing techniques who used Tibetan swords to cut away negative energy. Using a bowie knife, according to Three Eagles, makes the technique more Indian. Other demonstrations and workshops held at Serpent Mound examine alleged crop circles in the area and provide training in dowsing for water.

The Crystal Skull Festival brought people from around the world to Serpent Mound in 2011. The festival brought together 13 ancient crystal skulls at Serpent Mound in 2011 for a ceremony intended to ignite paranormal powers at the site. According to a story in The Columbus Dispatch, the ceremony also brought together several Mayan priests who were to discuss the end of the world prophesied by the Mayan calendar in 2012. Followers of the crystal skulls prophecy believe that the skulls are pre-Columbian Mesoamerican artifacts created by the Aztecs or Mayans and will exhibit paranormal powers if brought together in one place. Researchers such as Jane MacLaren Walsh, an anthropologist with the Smithsonian have found that the skulls likely were produced during the second half of the 19th century in Europe and Mexico. The skulls have no proven connection to any pre-Columbian culture she notes in an article in Archaeology magazine.

Longtime resident and earthworks enthusiast Geoffrey Sea noted something weirdly familiar about much of the terminology used by New Age groups—such as “intergalactic portals”—and the notion that secret elements were being mined at Serpent Mound. “Why do I know this?” wondered the local historian and researcher. “There is an element of cheesy science fiction that runs through all of this.” He finally realized that much of the New Age terms relating to Serpent Mound and the “light warriors” seems to come from the 1994 film Stargate. According to Sea, the film’s story line features space travelers who enter a giant portal that, once activated, zaps them across the galaxy, where they encounter an alien civilization that looks like ancient Egypt. The aliens are mining a secret element used to power space ships.

Mining for New Age Dollars
For economically depressed Adams County, cashing in on New Age interest in Serpent Mound could be lucrative. Recreating the area as a New Age travel destination could benefit the local economy. For instance, nearby Hocking Hills county has emerged as a travel destination in recent years. Similar to Adams, Hocking Hills’ economy offered little for residents in terms of jobs. Recently, however, Hocking Hills has recreated itself as the “Hot tub capital of the Midwest,” according to chamber of commerce materials. Hocking Hills is now home to many local businesses featuring popular vacation getaways in the form of cabins with hot tubs.

The New Age dollar would seem to be worth pursuing. According to a 2009 study conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, 26 percent of American adults follow some sort of New Age practice or belief. The Unite the Collective website offers a number of orgonites and wands for sale, some for hundreds of dollars. Even the struggling nonprofit Arc of Appalachia, responsible for managing and funding the daily operations of Serpent Mound site, offers numerous New Age books for sale at the mound bookstore. Until recently, the shop also sold orgonites created by a local artist, but McCane says, “They really didn’t sell very well.”

Kenny Frost a Southern Ute citizen, has worked to protect sacred places for more than 20 years. He is a well-respected authority on Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act issues and law and frequently consults with state, federal and tribal governments. “The protection put down by Native people at sacred sites is still there. Non-Native people dig around and see what they can find; they may end up opening a Pandora’s box without knowing how to put spirits back,” he notes.

Native people, on the other hand, are taught to respect sacred places honoring them with simple prayer and respect.

The Old-Age Perspective
Ironically, Serpent Mound’s strange role as repository for outlandish activities and beliefs may be partially due to the lack of Natives in Ohio. Since there is no public information tying Serpent Mound to contemporary Native tribes, many people freely bring their interpretations to the mound, notes Marti L. Chaatsmith, Comanche, director of the nearby Newark Earthworks Center of Ohio at the Ohio State University at Newark. She agrees with Lepper and Wallace that an explanation of the importance of sacred places for Native peoples as well as descriptions of appropriate ways to treat these sites are sorely needed there, and scoffs at stories of space aliens at Serpent Mound: “Serpent Mound was not built by aliens or lost tribes; it was built by American Indians.”

Johnson offers New Agers a guide to sacred sites. (Mary Annette Pember)

Lepper also believes that ancestors of American Indians built Serpent Mound and the nearby Newark Earthworks. Although contemporary tribes have no specific stories relating to the mound, it doesn’t mean their ancestors didn’t build them—he says it “is tragic that dislocation severed their ties to the mounds and earthworks.”

Members of the Eastern Shawnee tribe are fighting to reconnect with their homeland and work with organizations like the Newark Earthworks Center and Ohio Historical Society to create educational programming that can be presented to the public at venues like Serpent Mound according to Wallace.
Although many people purport to know about the history of the Shawnee in Ohio and seek to represent them, they have little information about the tribe today Wallace explains. Local groups with limited connection to the Shawnee often misrepresent facts about the tribe such as Johnson’s claim that the Shawnee believe that space travelers used Serpent Mound as a marker.

The Earthworks Center is hosting a conference this summer during which Wallace and a group of Eastern Shawnee people will return to their homelands. During the visit they plan to share information about their spiritual and cultural connections with the Earthworks with the public. Wallace, Lepper and Chaatsmith hope they can offer an important indigenous perspective on such sites. “The Shawnee are ancestrally related to the builders of the mounds and can speak for them on their behalf,” says Lepper, who argues that excluding indigenous perspectives and input in treatment of such sites seems damaging and demeaning to Native peoples.

“These types of New Age activities”—like burying orgonites—“do indeed concern us, but much of our struggle here in Oklahoma has focused on our physical survival,” Wallace says. “We are working with authorities in Ohio to preserve these sacred sites. We are following the legacy of our ancestors who respected and preserved the earthworks.”

For Lepper, growing New Age interest in Serpent Mound presents a double-edged sword. He acknowledges the untapped tourism potential presented by New Age visitors and is pleased with the growing interest in the mound. Activities that include walking on and burying things in the mound and conducting unusual ceremonies, however, only serve to trivialize the importance of a sacred indigenous site—“Not only do such activities damage the mound, they demean the connection that Indigenous Peoples have to this sacred site.” 

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Ross Hamilton's picture
Ross Hamilton
Submitted by Ross Hamilton on
People who live in Indian Country generally let the white culture have his own opinion regarding the ancient sites. Most were destroyed by farming and town building, but a few--like the Serpent Mound--have remained to remind us of a very rich heritage that man easily go back thousands of years. If the so-called "New Agers" are keeping the spirit alive, let 'em continue because we have seen the disastrous effects white establishment has foisted on these sacred places and would continue to do so if people like these haven't stepped in and insisted on seeing the Serpent and other sites and sacred.

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
Great article. The best way to reclaim the mound is to host an annual Native American festival at the mound. It has to be very traditional and respectful. I recommend a "snake dance" in full feathered regalia. Only then will Quetzalcoatl, the "feathered- snake", will be reborn with a distinctly human, and Native American constituency. It will garner much public attention, and more importantly it will stymie any New Age effort to "hijack" your cultural heritage. The hopes of your ancient ancestors depend entirely upon you. Do not let them down.

Thomas T Johnson's picture
Thomas T Johnson
Submitted by Thomas T Johnson on
I'm sorry for the inaccuracy of this article but Mary Pember never received a list of sacred sites from me , nor was one ever offered. She is totally wrong and I would like her apology.

editors's picture
editors
Submitted by editors on
@Thomas Johnson: Thank you for your comment! The list is on your marketing materials.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
I have not a drop of native blood in me but my mother taught all 5 of us respect not only for native sites but also native people themselves. I am deeply hurt that others are disrespecting native sites especially grave sites. I don't know what it takes to get others to respect others .

Thomas T Johnson's picture
Thomas T Johnson
Submitted by Thomas T Johnson on
Yes Mary I see where you found this on the Internet search for House of Phacops. My Ex-wife did a lot of promoting of "sacred travel" to Egypt and beyond. That was a nice service, however I do not have a list of sacred sites available and I apologize if you were misled by out dated web information, many visitors leave comments about my place, which as you know are very hard if not impossible to delete. Perhaps you should work up a list of these wonderful sacred sites for all people to honor and express their appreciation to all the indegenous nations of the past when they come to Ohio. Learning and teaching about the history of the land is important, and It's refreshing to know that you are keeping it alive by presenting articles such as this. Thank you and Blessings Sister.

Michael Rep Hummel's picture
Michael Rep Hummel
Submitted by Michael Rep Hummel on
I am in total agreement that sites such as Serpent Mound's integrity is crucial to both the Archaeological record and to the respect due this ancient marvel and its Native American creators. Mr. Hamilton feels that "New Agers are keeping the spirit alive". While i personally regard this view as nonsense i do feel that all folks should be allowed to interpret and use these sites as their own wisdom (or lack of it as Mr. Sea point out) guides them as long as desecration is not involved. What happened in the past cannot be undone, but present and future generation's RESPECT for sacred sites and understanding of their genuine Native American roots and heritage is the issue here, I am total agreement with Dr. Lepper on that. Fanciful interpretations by plastic shaman upon misguided seekers is demeaning and subtly racist toward the Native American ancients that built these sites. While Mr. Hamilton would put all the blame on 'white culture' i do not see how his notions in any way rectifies the wrongs of the past, only facilitates further demeaning of Native American culture, and division of all with a common interest in knowing the truth. Red white or black we are human beings ALL ONE PEOPLE, and Serpent Mound belongs to us all. Aho! But yes indigenous Native Americans connected to her roots must have more say in her safekeeping.

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
It is of vital importance that you reinstate your most sacred rituals at your most sacred sites. If you don't, others will be more than happy to fill in the void for you. This is precisely what happened.

George Nightwalker Sr's picture
George Nightwal...
Submitted by George Nightwal... on
Sad....another tribal site that no doubt will, in the end, be used to make money generally for those who already have plenty. Look all around this USA. It's the same ol' story. It has been said, when will it be understood "money cannot be eaten".

aiahninchi ohoyo's picture
aiahninchi ohoyo
Submitted by aiahninchi ohoyo on
and just when i was starting to 'think' we had finally outgrown 'newagers'...why cant native past be accepted at face value and not turned into all kinds of imaginary images, alien workings and general nonsense...by the way...the burying of newage goodies in the mound is sacreligious...stop it...take your newage hippie junk and bury it in some whiteman construct somewhere

luvmygrnkidz's picture
luvmygrnkidz
Submitted by luvmygrnkidz on
It's nice that people are interested in the American Indian sites and beliefs, but what they do with it makes me embarassed for them...

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
No nobody and I mean nobody is nuttier than a "spiritual" white man/woman. All you have to do is watch the "History" channel to see they buy into really weird stuff. I guess we can only hope they are right and they soon get "beamed up" to the mother ship so the natives can get back to normal life.

thearcher77's picture
thearcher77
Submitted by thearcher77 on
The Eastern Shawnee were originally from Ohio but left the area along with several other tribes as part of the federal Indian Removal Act of 1830. Misusing and abusing Native sites is far too frequent. These sites should be celebrated but handled by or with a significant involvement of the indigenous Peoples ... Ohio needs to recognize and help preserve the Native American Legacy - stop non- native Americans from making money off the Serpent Mound and damaging it while doing so Glenna J. Wallace, chief of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, the Shawnee consider Serpent Mound a sacred site -I think an annual celebration should replace what non-natives are currently doing: walking, burying things in it ,holding non-native American rituals "vandalism" --- Non-native Americans manipulated history, the Serpent Mound among other sites is a sad reminder and the shops tours $$$ being tapped off from the State of Ohio, New Age or other non-natives is beyond offensive - How much belongs to the Shawnee or the other 9 tribes forcibly "removed" to Oklahoma from Ohio

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
I slightly disagree with Mr. Hummel. There is both physical and spiritual desecration. It would be a mistake to limit it to just the physical. Would it be appropriate to have a woodstock-like atmosphere at Arlington National Cemetery? I think everyone would say NO! Is that a form of desecration even-though no physical harm is being done? I would say YES. It is just as important to protect and preserve the mound's spiritual integrity as the mound itself. I do not separate the two. If you do, you will have a situation like the Newark Country Club superimposed over a sacred site. Physically it is protected, but it is being desecrated with each swing of the club in my view. The magic of the place is lost! The same is true with Serpent mound.

Terri Annette Rivera's picture
Terri Annette Rivera
Submitted by Terri Annette Rivera on
Hello and Blessings to all. I pray you hear what I see the majority of folks do at This Sacred site Serpent mound. Most folks when they arrive they are in awww, they honor this site as well as the ancestors who built it. They stay on the trails, they are respectful, they bring their children,they teach them to be respectful. They learn the history as far as it is known. Some come to pray wether by themselves of with a group, they come in all colors from all different nations and countries. Most folks do not see or try to take ownership or even try to interpret this sacred site. They come to see the beauty of the land, the birds, and the trees. Thank you for this article Mary Annette Pember Thank you for this forum, Indian Country. Those of you who have not made it to Serpent Mound, you should, Bring your children and lots of laughter. Thank you.

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
The profound becomes profane at the moment you try to commercialize a sacred site. It simply doesn't allow for it. Like a switch it automatically becomes cheap, tacky, and inauthentic. One must live the life of a pious monk to truly understand the nature of the place.

Geoffrey Sea
Geoffrey Sea
Submitted by Geoffrey Sea on
Excellent treatment of a vital issue in our region. It is not quite true that "there is no public information tying Serpent Mound to contemporary Native tribes." Serpent Mound is just one of a vast complex of ancient earthworks that extends from Ohio into West Virginia, Kentucky, and Indiana, linked by pathways, by architecture and by purpose. (Contrary to official agnosticism, it is clear that these earthworks served a mortuary purpose of helping departed spirits find their way in the afterlife journey.) Immediately adjacent to Serpent Mound to the south are four conical burial mounds and a burial ground that together span dates from about three thousand to about one thousand years ago, and the Serpent itself is clearly related to these burials -- a guide-path marker yes for flying spirits but in the form of bird-carriers not spaceships. It's a happy circumstance that motifs discovered on artifacts, genetic analysis of bones from area burials, historical linguistics, and oral tradition reflected in hundreds of ethnological reports, all agree that the civilization responsible for the principal earthworks of this region were of Algonquian identity, and this was recognized by Olaf Prufer, the dean of Ohio archaeology, at least as early as 1961, on the basis of Algonquian motifs and designs. Historical linguists even have a name for the language spoken by this civilization, which is the Proto-Lake dialect of Central Algonquian. Descendants of this civilization (more than a "culture") include the Shawnee, the Sac-Fox, the Kickapoo, the Miami and the Anishinaabeg. That the Stargate-Reptiloid-Crystal-Skull mambo-jumbo obscures information about the greatest civilization ever to rise in North America (including the modern one) is a real tragedy and one that requires ongoing vigilance. Many Indian and non-Indian voices in our region cried out for punishment of the orgonite-planters and those who incited them more serious than simple local prosecution (some suggested they be remanded to tribal jurisdictions). Now, alas, it seems that even local prosecution has been quietly dropped. Geoffrey Sea, Adena Core

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
A large scale "gathering of nations" event must take place in order to reclaim your cultural heritage as it pertains to this most sacred site. Your presence must be felt loudly! There is no other way.

Delsey Wilson
Delsey Wilson
Submitted by Delsey Wilson on
Why do you not post the Friends of Serpent Mound's comments toward this article?

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
I would even suggest "idle no more" type flash mobs at these new age events. It would be so disruptive that eventually OHS will have no choice but to ban these carnivals altogether.

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
The Indian Removal Act part 2, except on a spiritual level. And all in the name of commerce where the ends justify the means. Ethics is only an afterthought. The friends of the Adams County Chamber of Commerce are no friends of the mound, quite the opposite.

Stefan Radivoyevitch's picture
Stefan Radivoyevitch
Submitted by Stefan Radivoyevitch on
Unite the Collective are not the only ones who've destroyed the sanctity of these hallowed grounds. I would include management and the archaeological community as well - each in their own dubious way. All are sworn enemies of the mound as far as I'm concerned. Parasitic, bloodsucking leeches is all they are! The ugly side of human nature on full display. Welcome to the "new age" same as the old age. Only the garb is different. Stuck in the mud the wheel spins in one place. A revolution to nowhere.

Anne Glass's picture
Anne Glass
Submitted by Anne Glass on
What a nasty and condescending article. You clearly debase and ridicule those who do not share your own "outlandish" beliefs. What do you care what others choose to believe? I am sorry you choose to hate. Your heart sounds cold and dead.

Terri Annette Rivera's picture
Terri Annette Rivera
Submitted by Terri Annette Rivera on
@Anne Glass There are People who want control over Serpent Mound Most of these people are not even Native. If you are on Face Book you should Check out a group called Friends of Serpent mound Originally formed under the auspices of the OHS, FOSM is now an independently registered 501c3 organization. FOSM has volunteered tens of thousands of hours over the past nine years providing Serpent Mound with chaperone protection for all sorts of groups that have received permits and permissions from both the OHS and the Arc of Appalachia to hold events at Serpent Mound (FOSM has no authority to grant any such permissions to host events at Serpent Mound). The FOSM helped the OHS to host its slate of public events when they managed the site, and FOSM continues to host several of those events today, as well as volunteering as support help for archaeological projects at Serpent Mound, and advocating for the continued preservation of Serpent Mound, and the preservation of all other native-built mounds and earthwork sites across the USA. Jim Three Eagles and His wife Were Born and raised Close to the mound their families go back many Generations. Jim and Bev are on the board of Friends of Serpent Mound. They would never Take a dime for any thing when it comes to the Mound. Their hearts and soul are in this sacred site. Friends group would never tell someone how to think and Pray. The Friends of Serpent Mound WALK THEIR TALK!!!! THEY DONT JUST TALK, TALK, TALK LIKE OTHERS, for Talk is Cheap! Blessings to all Blessings to all

EagleEye's picture
EagleEye
Submitted by EagleEye on
So...the author thinks "New Age" people are crazy and Ancient Alien advocates are also crazy and so that demeans the beliefs of Native Americans when tribes like the Hopi very much DO believe in "Star Brothers" and Kachinas are based on these Star People. Demean their beliefs? It sounds like some of them are celebrating at least some beliefs held by some tribes. Fueling stations? Unlikely, but that doesn't mean ancient civilizations didn't hold the Heavens in high regard (as evidence by the numerous astrological observatories and alignments they used). Frankly, I'm more offended by the article author imposing his viewpoints on others. How much do you want to bet he has religious beliefs of his own? People are SO intolerant of other people's beliefs it's just ridiculous these days. It's why we have gridlock. People want to force their own beliefs on other people. I find it disgusting. No, they shouldn't be trying to bury things there. But if they aren't harming the site, WTF are you to tell them what to think or believe? People need to respect that there are different views an opinions. We've got terrorists trying to force their extremist views on people in other parts of the world. That's where you eventually end up when you can't stand letting other people have their own opinions.

Terri Annette Rivera's picture
Terri Annette Rivera
Submitted by Terri Annette Rivera on
Well said Eagle eye and very powerful!! blessings and love
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