Notable Quotes

Stories

I like telling traditional stories to students because there are so many different versions. When I share stories, I always tell them, "This is how it was told to me." — Lois Liston, Tohono O’odham

 

Words

Words are one thing, but actions are another. — Jefferson Keel, President, National Congress of American Indians

Students

When students are taught as respected human beings instead of being talked at—and these are two different things—students will respect you and want to work and understand more. — David Katzeek, Tlingit

Common Danger

Think not that you can remain passive and indifferent to the common danger, and thus escape the common fate. — Tecumseh 

Give Us Wisdom

Give us wisdom to guide us on the path of truth. — Sose-Ha-Wa, Seneca 

If You Listen

If you listen close at night, you will hear the creatures of the dark, all of them sacred—the owls, the crickets, the frogs, the night birds. And you will hear beautiful songs—songs you have never heard before.
Listen with your heart. Never stop listening. — Henry Quick Bear, Lakota

If You Listen

If you listen close at night, you will hear the creatures of the dark, all of them sacred—the owls, the crickets, the frogs, the night birds. And you will hear beautiful songs—songs you have never heard before.
Listen with your heart. Never stop listening. — Henry Quick Bear, Lakota

We Are Indians

Once I was in Victoria, and I saw a very large house. They told me it was a bank and that the white men place their money there to be taken care of, and that by and by they got it back with interest. "We are Indians and we have no such bank; but when we have plenty of money or blankets, we give them away to other chiefs and people, and by and by they return them with interest, and our hearts feel good. Our way of giving is our bank. — Chief Maquinna

I Am a Red Man

I am a red man. If the Great Spirit had desired me to be a white man he would have made me so in the first place. He put in your heart certain wishes and plans, in my heart he put other and different desires. Each man is good in his sight. It is not necessary for Eagles to be Crows. We are poor..but we are free. No white man controls our footsteps. If we must die...we die defending our rights. — Sitting Bull

In Early Days

In early days we were close to nature. We judged time, weather conditions, and many things by the elements--the good earth, the blue sky, the flying of geese, and the changing winds. We looked to these for guidance and answers. Our prayers and thanksgiving were said to the four winds--to the East, from whence the new day was born; to the South, which sent the warm breeze which gave a feeling of comfort; to the West, which ended the day and brought rest; and to the North, the Mother of winter whose sharp air awakened a time of preparation for the long days ahead. We lived by God's hand through nature and evaluated the changing winds to tell us or warn us of what was ahead. — Unknown Speaker addressing the National Congress of American Indians in the mid 1960's
Today we are again evaluating the changing winds. May we be strong in spirit and equal to our Fathers of another day in reading the signs accurately and interpreting them wisely. May Wah-Kon-Tah, the Great Spirit, look down upon us, guide us, inspire us, and give us courage and wisdom. Above all, may He look down upon us and be pleased.

Pages