Opinions

3/15/11
BY:
Michael E. Roberts
Can Indian country achieve prosperity without risk? Or better yet, are we courageous enough to lead the way to economic prosperity and sovereignty by trusting proven Indian institutions and putting economic control and power in the hands of our own...
3/15/11
BY:
Mark Trahant
Like most people I watched the events in Japan unfold on cable and through Facebook throughout the weekend. It’s great to see posts from friends and friends-of-friends who are OK. However I watch other reports with growing fears for the people who...
3/14/11
BY:
Tanya Fiddler
Last week I was vigorously working to meet a deadline for a grant application (as many of us living in the nonprofit world spend a lot of our time doing), and I was completely baffled by some of the economic statistics I looked up for my community,...
3/13/11
BY:
Steven Newcomb
At a hefty 560 pages, Walter Echo-Hawk’s noteworthy book In The Courts Of The Conqueror: The 10 Worst Indian Law Cases Ever Decided (Fulcrum, 2010) examines U.S. federal Indian law within the scope of ten U.S. Supreme Court rulings. Given the short...
3/11/11
BY:
David Trout Staddon
The Indian nickname and mascot debate continues. The most prevalent argument in favor of them is that they “honor” Indians. The real question is, “Where is the ‘honor’ in being a mascot?” Having served on a committee to recommend whether or not a...
3/11/11
BY:
Steven Paul McSloy
It always was, and always is, about the land. Every so often, articles in The Wall Street Journal (and sometimes even This Week From Indian Country Today) touting the advantages of private property for Indian people, not to mention Supreme Court...
3/9/11
BY:
Daniel Ward
As dictators topple across North Africa into the Middle East, and new uprisings coalesce on almost a daily basis, one of the most striking aspects of this new revolutionary wave is the ability of its participants to communicate not only with their...
3/8/11
BY:
Maria Cuomo Cole
In the short-term budget agreement reached last week by Congress and the White House, $75 million in housing aid for 10,000 homeless veterans was cut. At a time when we're pushing American soldiers to the limit of endurance, we just pushed 10,000 of...
3/7/11
BY:
Mark Trahant
Finally the economy seems to be creating jobs again. Last week a federal jobs survey showed an increase in 222,000 private sector jobs, a full year of growth that added 1.5 million jobs at companies and small businesses. As Austan Goolsbee,...
3/4/11
BY:
Steven Newcomb
The aggregate of ideas commonly called “federal Indian law” involves matters of epistemology—or what Ernst Von Glasersfeld has termed, “how we acquire knowledge of reality, and how reliable and ‘true’ that knowledge might be.” In an essay entitled “...
3/3/11
BY:
Billy Frank, Jr.
More than 1,500 salmon were seen spawning in Coho Creek on the Tulalip Tribes’ reservation in Washington state last fall. Pretty good considering 10 years ago, the creek was nothing but a drainage ditch in the Quilceda Creek watershed. The Tulalips...
3/1/11
BY:
Jaeleen Araujo
The Sealaska land legislation is an amendment to a forty year old act of Congress, but a lengthy public outreach process involving more than 225 meetings with local Southeast Alaska communities, stakeholders and organizations has set the stage for...
2/28/11
BY:
Mark Trahant
This week represents, perhaps, the most important week of lobbying for tribal nations since the end of the termination era. At a variety of meetings in Washington, D.C., including the National Congress of American Indians, leaders from Indian...
2/25/11
BY:
Gabriel S. Galanda
Two months ago, I published a series on the federal Indian consultation right, suggesting that the battle line in the ongoing tribal war against federalism should first be drawn in tribal council chambers—through federal-tribal consultation. There...

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