Opinions

5/22/11
BY:
Steve Russell
When I was consulting Prof. Google about Mexico earlier today, I was shocked that a number of travel sites take the line that "you are perfectly safe as long as you are not involved in drugs." That's nonsense, and it's dangerous nonsense. I...
5/21/11
BY:
Kevin Gover
Congress established the National Museum of the American Indian in 1989, noting that the establishment of the museum within the Smithsonian would “give all Americans the opportunity to learn of the cultural legacy, historical grandeur, and...
5/20/11
BY:
Crystal Willcuts
A few weeks ago I stopped watching the news. Nothing else was going on in the world except for the Osama Bin Laden death frenzy. Okay he’s dead, but he was going to die anyway. We’ll all die eventually. It will be news the day no one dies. The TV...
5/19/11
BY:
Tom Vilsack
Before I was sworn in as Secretary of Agriculture, recent folks who had the job—both Republican and Democratic—suggested that it was important that I set a new, proactive course to move past USDA’s checkered and unfortunate history with regards to...
5/16/11
BY:
Mark Trahant
Republican Party unity on the issue of a massive restructuring of Medicare and Medicaid (if there is such a thing) ended this weekend. Presidential candidate and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich said on NBC’s Meet the Press that he opposed the...
5/16/11
BY:
Billy Frank, Jr.
A basic rule of natural resources management today is that you don’t take too much of something unless you have a good idea how much there is to begin with. That was the point behind the Squaxin Island Tribe’s effort to protect water resources in...
5/13/11
BY:
Peter J. Pitts
President Obama recently gave a speech outlining a framework for reducing the federal debt by $4 trillion over the next 12 years. There are many questions about the president’s budget plans. But the most urgent one is: Why has he declared war on...
5/11/11
BY:
Charles Trimble
Certain words come into vogue and quickly become cliches, and I’m always glad to see them disappear. In the early 1960s, for example, everybody was using the word copacetic, meaning good, cool, or however a person wanted to describe something as...
5/11/11
BY:
Steven Newcomb
Many people angrily responded to my previous column on this subject by claiming that the U.S. military had merely applied the Apache leader Geronimo’s name to the U.S. military operation to hunt down bin Laden, and had not applied the name to bin...
5/10/11
BY:
Donna Loring
So it’s official: the code name for Bin Laden was "Geronimo." To refer to a terrorist like Bin Laden, whom some have compared to Hitler, with the name of an honored and respected Native American warrior is the ultimate insult to every Native...
5/10/11
BY:
Mark Trahant
Nobel-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz is trying to change the national debate about the deficit, the role of government and the impact of those policies on the day-to-day economy. (NPR: "Deficit Solution: Get Americans Back To Work") “There are...
5/9/11
BY:
Tim Johnson
Included in the millions of people throughout the United States and around the world who welcomed the demise of Osama Bin Laden were American Indians. Not since Adolf Hitler has there been such a universally despised figure, so replete with immoral...
5/9/11
BY:
Marine Sisk-Franco
When the letter arrived at our village, I wasn’t around, but my mom and dad told me they picked it up like it weighed a thousand pounds. They held it up to the light and joked about trying to figure out what it said before I could see it. They were...
5/7/11
BY:
Ruth Hopkins
The anger in Indian country over the association of Osama Bin Laden with Geronimo is palpable, and rightly so. Aligning the Apache leader Geronimo—who fought valiantly for his tribal homeland and people against incredible odds—with the cowardly...

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