Rob Capriccioso
5/15/14
The Senate voted unanimously May 14 to confirm Diane Humetewa to become a judge for the U.S...
Steven Newcomb

When people these days discuss the United Nations (UN) Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, they have no idea that 70 years ago, just before the end of World War II, such a document was already being envisioned....

5/14/14
Brian Cladoosby, NCAI president
5/13/14
Last week, the nation suffered a great loss as Billy Frank, Jr. walked on. There is no better example of what it means to be a modern tribal leader than Billy...
ICTMN Staff
5/10/14
The following is a statement by the National Congress of American Indians in regards to a proposed rally by Cliven Bundy and his supporters: Cliven Bundy’s group plans to ride roug...
Peter d’Errico

Many critics of a certain football team's use of the "R" word concede that there is no "free speech" issue....

5/10/14
Michael Willis

The poor state of roads and bridges in Indian country is well-documented, and all too familiar to tribal citizens who face impassable roads during storms, rough dirt roads that are the only routes to take children to school, and bridges that may only be accessible seasonally. The lack of road safety features result in crash injuries and death more often in Indian Country than anywhere else in the United States. Decrepit infrastructure has hindered economic development and stifled job growth in many tribal communities.

On April 29, U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx put forward the Obama Administration’s transportation bill, “Grow America Act,” which has the construction industry, labor leaders and transportation policy advocates praising the effort to stimulate congressional action on needed investment in the nation’s deteriorating road, bridge, and rail networks. The proposal reflects some of Indian Country’s transportation needs, but falls short of the commitment required to reduce the historical funding inequities that have left many tribal roads systems stuck in the mud. Moreover, the viability of the Obama Administration’s proposal depends upon Congress adopting tax reform measures that generate new revenue to shore up the depleted Highway Trust Fund -- a big presumption given partisan gridlock in Washington.

Most Indian tribes operate their own transportation departments with funding received through the Highway Trust Fund, and these tribal transportation programs are crucial to providing safe and reliable roads, bridges and transit services. The effectiveness of such programs is essential to stimulating commerce, job creation and economic development in Indian Country.

Representatives from Indian country have been working to build momentum for tribal transportation legislation that boosts funding and further empowers tribes to transform dangerous and deficient roads and bridges into transportation networks that can safely provide tribal citizens better access to services, resources and commerce.

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the Intertribal Transportation Association and the newly-formed Tribal Transportation Unity Caucus have linked tribes and tribal organizations in an effort to develop and promote the “Tribal Transportation Unity Act,” a proposal for comprehensive tribal transportation legislation. This tribal coalition presented their proposal to key transportation and infrastructure committees in the Congress the week before Secretary Foxx delivered his.

The Tribal Unity proposal urges the United States to deepen its commitment to infrastructure investment and transportation services in Indian Country through substantial funding increases as well as terms that provide tribal governments greater authority to plan, construct and operate transportation programs to meet tribal needs. The Obama Administration’s “Grow America Act” reflects some of these priorities, but fails to contemplate the level of investment or the breadth of tribal authority contained in the Tribal Unity Act legislation.

The most significant challenge facing tribes is the lack of adequate funding to meet the overwhelming and documented need. This Congress has objected to increasing investment in transportation when revenues from its sole funding source—the federal gas tax—are declining...

5/7/14
Gale Courey Toensing
5/7/14
“I tell my people to get ready. Get your smokehouses back in shape. Don’t forget the ceremonies. That guy, the salmon, he’s coming back.” Billy Frank Jr...
Richard Walker
5/6/14
Everyone had expected to see Billy Frank Jr. sometime that day at the mid-year conference of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians...
Quinault Nation Press Release
5/1/14
President Fawn Sharp of the Quinault Indian Nation says she is happy to participate on the Carbon Emissions Reduction Task Force Governor Jay Inslee created by executive order yest...
ICTMN Staff
4/24/14
National Congress of American Indians President Brian Cladoosby has put the United States Department of State Secretary John Kerry on notice...

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