Comanche Boy drops Sho Gun. (Scott Rain)

Winner by TKO, Your New NABA Middleweight Boxing Champion ... George "Comanche Boy" Tahdooahnippah!

Sam Laskaris
10/1/12

Comanche Boy is still undefeated and the proud owner of a new championship belt.

But George "Comanche Boy" Tahdooahnippah's latest boxing match had a rather confusing and somewhat controversial end on Friday. Fighting in front of a hometown crowd, Tahdooahnippah defeated Gundrick "Sho Gun" King to capture the vacant North American Boxing Association (NABA) middleweight crown. The bout was staged at the Comanche Nation Casino in Lawton, Oklahoma.
Comanche Boy, who has Comanche and Choctaw ancestry, was eventually declared the winner via a technical knockout in the third round.
The controversy started when King's corner requested the bout be stopped as their fighter was bleeding from a cut about his left eye. King's handlers, however, told ringside officials an accidental butting of heads caused their fighter's cut.
As a result, the original decision was announced as a no-contest (and no winner was declared) as it was believed the referee had stopped the bout. A chorus of boos from Tahdooahnippah's supporters quickly ensued.
But the referee frantically waved his arms upon hearing that announcement. And after a meeting with the judges, he told them that he had not stopped the fight but rather it was King's corner that opted not to continue.
Then, a second announcement came that Tahdooahnippah had indeed won the bout. And he was presented with his NABA belt.
Tahdooahnippah, who improved his record to 31-0-1 (including 23 knockouts), said he never butted heads with King in the match.
"I hit him in the second round with my right hand and cut him above his eye," he said. "He just kept bleeding. He wanted to quit. I was hitting him with some good shots."
The bout was stopped twice to clean up King's blood, once in the second round and once in the third.
After checking King in the third round, Tahdooahnippah said the ringside doctor told King he would be able to continue even though blood was coming down the side of his eye.
"He kept telling him, 'I can't see. I can't see,'" Tahdooahnippah said of King. "So his corner quit."
With the loss, King's record dropped to 18-9-0.
For Tahdooahnippah, Friday's fight signified his first with Star Boxing, the prestigious New York-based promotional company he signed with in July.
"I think I proved myself," he said. "I showed them I'm ready for a challenge. I'd like to fight against some of the tough names that are out there."
Though a sellout of about 2,000 people saw the fight in person, Tahdooahnippah was somewhat disappointed more did not get a chance to view the bout. There was supposed to be a pay-per-view Internet broadcast of the outdoor card.
"The pay-per-view company didn't show up," Tahdooahnippah said. "There was rain in the forecast. But it never did rain. I was curious to see how many people would have watched it on the Internet."
For the 33-year-old Tahdooahnippah, the NABA title he won was the third pro belt he has captured.
"Career-wise it's another belt I have to get on the way to a bigger belt," said Tahdooahnippah, who aspires to one day win a world championship.
A year ago Tahdooahnippah captured the World Boxing Council (WBC) Continental Americas middleweight belt. And he had been presented with his first pro belt in 2008, the Native American Boxing Council's super middleweight belt.
Though no details have been announced, Tahdooahnippah is hoping his next fight will be in either November or December.


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