Courtesy Cindy La Marr
Native American Student Chiitaanibah Johnson (Navajo / Naakaí' Diné and Konkow Maidu) recently met with her University President Robert S. Nelsen. Johnson says she is disappointed Nelsen said his 'hands were tied.'

Native Student and Family Disappointed After Meeting With University President Re Native Genocide

Vincent Schilling
9/12/15

One week after 19-year-old Native American student Chiitaanibah Johnson of California State University, Sacramento says she was disenrolled from her U.S. History class for disagreeing with her professor over the existence of Native American genocide, Johnson and her family met with Sacramento State President Robert S. Nelsen to discuss the matter. Though Johnson and her family say the meeting was cordial and sincere, they feel disappointed and say they fear neither the school nor the president will be taking any action that will satisfactorily address their concerns.

President Nelsen agreed to meet on Thursday with Johnson as well as her mother, Martina Johnson, father Kurt Johnson and Cindy La Marr (Pit River and Paiute), Executive Director of Capitol Area Indian Resources, Inc. in Sacramento, an organization that advocates for the academic and cultural rights of American Indian students. Nelsen told the family and the University has told ICTMN in an email that the President will also be meeting with Professor Maury Wiseman, the professor involved in the matter, at a later time.

READ MORE: History Professor Denies Native Genocide: Native Student Disagreed, Then Says Professor Expelled Her From Course 

Sac State History Dept Tweets - "Student Not Disenrolled"

Sac State and Native Student Seek 'Positive Resolution' on Native Genocide Class Disenrollment Issue

Johnson says she was comforted by the meeting’s informality but fears a viable solution may never happen. “The president was respectful, open and I didn't expect it to be just him,” she said. “I thought someone would be recording it or there would possibly be a lawyer present, but there wasn’t.

“But when we pressed for a solution,” says Johnson, “the president told me that his hands were basically tied. I thought at least the professor’s class might be monitored or evaluated on some level. But the professor is still teaching and going on with his class.”

Cindy La Marr, who has worked with public schools and universities for many years for the benefit of Indian country, says she was not as impressed by Nelsen’s cordial demeanor. She told ICTMN that some of Nelsen’s proposed solutions were not sufficient. La Marr said Nelsen told them about a proposed University ‘California Native American Day,’ on September 25th that would hold seminars on Native Americans. “I asked if the instructor would be required to attend this, and he said, ‘No.’”

La Marr says that when she and the family asked if there was going to be any disciplinary action against the professor, President Nelsen said Professor Wiseman was protected by his faculty’s labor union. “I asked if there was a vetting process for hiring part-time adjunct faculty and he said he did not know,” Lamar told ICTMN. “He said he was new and there were binders full of policies that protected faculty that he had not reviewed. I asked if part-time adjunct instructors were protected by faculty labor unions. He said, ‘Yes.’”

La Marr says after the Johnson family’s repeated attempts to ask if the professor would be disciplined were deflected, they decided to leave. “I continually asked, ‘What is your plan?’” Martina Johnson said. “The President just told us, ‘It is out of my hands.’”

In addition to speaking to ICTMN, student Chiitaanibah Johnson also issued a written statement addressing her thoughts on the meeting. 

The President was fair, open and welcoming in hearing my concerns. I appreciated his candor regarding the bureaucratic and regulatory restrictions his office is subject to with regards to the limited actions he is allowed to take with regards to the issues at hand.

However, I am particularly concerned that while CSU-Sacramento officials are working to transfer me into another course, Professor Wiseman, under protection of the faculty teacher’s union and legal team, is still teaching under no observation or supervision while under investigation and that curriculum changes to actually address GENOCIDE are even less likely. 

Having met with the CSU-Sacramento President, a fair and reasonable resolution to these issues appears unlikely within the current bureaucratic bounds of the university.

There are three very important points we want to make very clear:

·         Genocide is and always has been wrong.

·         Teaching otherwise is wrong.

·         Instructors demonstrating such lack of academic rigor and acting in a manner both aggressive and intimidating manner of stifling student questioning should be held accountable in a manner both fair and timely.

 

Chiitaanibah Johnson’s father Kurt Johnson added to his daughter’s remarks and told ICTMN, “The professor’s statements were a product of a direct lack of academic rigor. Academic freedom does not preclude academic responsibility.” 

ICTMN has reached out to Sacramento State regarding the meeting. University spokesperson Elisa Smith replied in an email with the following statement:

President Nelsen had an extensive, fact-gathering meeting with Ms. Johnson and her family as he attempts to achieve a positive resolution in this matter.  He also is meeting with Prof. Wiseman.

As the fact-finding continues, and because this is an ongoing personnel matter, we cannot comment further at this time.

In the meantime, President Nelsen’s message to the campus earlier this week speaks for itself:

We at the University believe in academic freedom, and we also believe in civility and rigorous academic research. Our standards must be high, and we must follow the processes that we have put in place to ensure that the rights of students and faculty are protected.

Johnson says when she first returned to the school after the incident, she felt as if people were looking her way but not overtly staring or being intrusive. Though she says she is disappointed in the outcome thus far, she is encouraged by the outpouring of support from Indian country.

“It is what it is. I had no idea what to expect based on what happened but I told myself not to be not to set on the idea that the professor would be reprimanded,” she says. “I thought they might make him apologize or something else. The president basically said his hands were tied and there was only so much he could do.

“I feel unresolved about the issue.  But my mom says, ‘There are Indian people all over the country that are supporting you because they know the truth and they know you stood up for them.’ 

“There is a conversation now,” says Johnson. “And people are talking about whether genocide has happened. My father said something that really affected me. He said, 'Even if nothing else happens, the circulation of this story and the effects on conversations across the country are more than my own grandfather could have done.’ If I had done something like this back then, it could have gotten me killed. But here I am. 

“I didn't realize how good having the blessing of so many Indian people would feel. I've only known the natives of the outer rings of my family or in college, but I've never felt so connected to Indian country.”

 

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Wayne Joseph Borean
Wayne Joseph Borean
Submitted by Wayne Joseph Borean on
And the support of many of us of non-native ancestry. Keep the pressure on. They may be hoping that the issue goes away. Don't let it.

Ruth Lanton
Ruth Lanton
Submitted by Ruth Lanton on
Ms Johnson- it's not just Native Americans who are following your story and supporting you. I'm an American Jew and I'm behind you as well.

Dee Anderson
Dee Anderson
Submitted by Dee Anderson on
Well, I ( as a "white" 8th generation American ( from England)) only heard of the "Doctrine of Discovery" when we moved to Rapid City , South Dakota through the UCC Church. When the "homesteaders" were told they could take land and the Government pushed and forced people that lived here for centuries and took the best land and killed their sustenance ( buffalo) and other food resources away that did cause death. A forced Death by any other name is still death and that is a purposeful event and is genocide because the powerful thought they were better and wanted the land to prosper for themselves and not really for the benefit of all mankind. When the people that say they disagree on genecide because a lot of initial deaths were from disease or that tribes fought other tribes over land then they are wrong. They admit that "tribes" had a concern over the land they used ( e.g.-- like a title of a homestead bought and paid for by years of land use) That is a right that "whites" say they have but somehow forget ( HA) or admit that the native peoples as the Lakota had "rights" too. When there was killings of defenseless woman and children ( and not just Warriors fighting for their homes) then that is genocide and it should be taught as history.

Andre Leonard
Andre Leonard
Submitted by Andre Leonard on
It's called deliberate indifference. After 240 years it's also now institutionalized. Sit down, listen, take some notes, nod in agreement. Then do nothing..

tmsyr11's picture
tmsyr11
Submitted by tmsyr11 on
A sorry saga: Obama signs Native American apology resolution; FAILED to draw attention to it. If the United States government (under power and might of Barack Obama) didn't apologize DIRECTLy to the Native peoples, i.e. via "genocide", then why is an individual, good and decent person (Professor Wiseman), being held to such high and irresponsible standards? >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> By Rob Capriccioso Story Published: Jan 13, 2010 WASHINGTON - Is an apology that’s not said out loud really an apology? What if the person expressing the apology doesn’t draw attention to it? Those are questions that some tribal citizens are asking upon learning that President Barack Obama signed off on the Native American Apology Resolution Dec. 19 as part of a defense appropriations spending bill. The resolution originated in Congress and had passed the Senate as stand-alone legislation in the fall. The House ended up adding the resolution to their version of the defense bill in conference. ….The resolution also includes a disclaimer: Nothing in it authorizes or supports any legal claims against the United States, and the resolution does not settle any claims. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> I did find interesting, however, how the US Government noted their clause in the form of a disclaimer.

tmsyr11's picture
tmsyr11
Submitted by tmsyr11 on
Its no secret considering the review and analysis of American history, this country has been very, very, HARD on people. Consider the violence, disruption, and deaths of the American Civil War…..650,000 to 800,000 deaths in the time-frame of 1861-1865. Coincidentially, the time-frame of Navajo Long Walk to Fort Sumner New Mexico. The Long Walk to Bosque Redondo (Navajo: Hwéeldi), refers to the 1864 deportation of the Navajo people….."Place of Suffering"!!!!! The tragedy and history of events indicates no-body could have stopped what was coming. This was the 'vanity' of the impact. And still wears and hold true today (the effect). Fundamental true value of Dine' have long ago, put this tragedy away considering THEY rightfully and purposefully agreed this happened long ago and 'why' DWELL and bring up the past! Which probably led to rapid and greatest expansim of TRUE Navajo Government (People) sovereignty during the 1950s-1970s. Coincidentialy, the establishment of American Industry domestically and world-wide!

Susanna Iris Astarte
Susanna Iris Astarte
Submitted by Susanna Iris Astarte on
I am angry and upset by this entire chain of events. Denying the genocide of the Indigenous Americans at the hands of whites is like denying the Holocaust. How can anyone get away with this ? I hope someone has contacted the ACLU. We cannot let this stand.

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
"Indian people all over the country," supporting you amounts to nearly nothing. You have our love and our support, but as with the NFL issue, the San Carlos land-grabbing issue, the abused women issue no one cares about NDNs but NDNs themselves. Money talks, bullshit walks and the "powers that be" make sure we're not able to accumulate too much $.

tmsyr11's picture
tmsyr11
Submitted by tmsyr11 on
If the "reports" of the Delta State shooting of a college history professor r true, lets hope it had nothing to do with 'history'. A tragedy either way to have occured today.

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
(from the article): 'Even if nothing else happens, the circulation of this story and the effects on conversations across the country are more than my own grandfather could have done.’ If I had done something like this back then, it could have gotten me killed. But here I am. ____________________________________________________________ This has GOT to be the saddest statement I've ever read. To think that we are successful in our pursuit of respect and equal treatment if we manage to stay alive. Not much has changed since the 1800s. Why is it that only minorities have to worry about this?

Mojo Hand's picture
Mojo Hand
Submitted by Mojo Hand on
You also have the support of this Asian American. We must not let these revisionist historians change the narrative or deny what took place. When the powers that be do, they take away your voice and minimize who you are and what happened to your people.

rainsdance's picture
rainsdance
Submitted by rainsdance on
I grew up in Australia where throughout my childhood I was bullied, isolated, victimised and victim blamed by the members of my classes and almost every teacher I encountered for the relatively minor crime of being a different kind of Christian. I say relatively because I grew up in close proximity to a family of indigenous Australians who also faced similar persecution on a more systematic scale. In spite of this persecution they were among the warmest and kindest people I have ever met. For me the only safe place in the school was the library where the rule of silence and the constant presence of the librarian disallowed much of the worst harassment to take place. I spent a lot of time there and eventually ended up reading my way through whole swathes of the shelves. One of my favourite sections was history - which became one of my best subjects. This and the first-hand examples of persecution I saw right in front of me taught me that the horrors in those history books were alive and well and still happening right in front of my eyes. I think that people like this read history and find it to be so abhorrent that they don't want to believe that it's possible. So they go into denial and in so doing they become part of the problem. They can't reconcile the grandiose "good" things that happened in their history with the violent tradgedies that are the flip-side. So they deny that it occured at all and every historical fact that proves otherwise is an attack on their carefully constructed fairy-tale history and they react defensively and in so doing compound the problem - and the tragedies repeat. And the loss of entire cultures is a tragedy. Personally I really believe that history is one of the most important subjects to ever learn at school because it serves as the foundation for the way society currently functions. Which is why this is so important. Professors cannot be allowed to teach their own biased versions of history without being questioned or corrected when they get it wrong. Those who ignore or deny history are doomed to repeat it. Thank you for standing up for your history. Thank you for surviving. You make our world a better, richer place by your existence. Thank you.

Beth Enson
Submitted by Beth Enson on
I've started a petition to requite Professor Wiseman to attend a Native students' forum to educate himself about the reality of genocide:(sorry you'll have to cut and paste the URL- can't get a hyperlink going) https://www.change.org/p/robert-nelsen-president-garciap-saclink-csus-edu-jill-peterson-csus-edu-emills-csus-edu-fraka-harmsen-csus-edu-cal-state-require-professor-who-denies-genocide-to-attend-native-students-forum

tmsyr11's picture
tmsyr11
Submitted by tmsyr11 on
Which AGAIN begs the question: where were all the 'HATERS' of Dr. Wiseman and THOSE racial agitators of white 'agression' 'colonolism' when the United States Government, headed by Barack Obama as the 43rd US President (the "Great Black Father"), signed and made US Public policy: an Apology Resolution? Rightfully, there were a handful of real Indian people who made statements, but the large majority of 'non-indians' from these articles were too enamoured with the 2009 HOPE and CHANGE jingle….. Sadly, if this were a 'white' US President, then……maybe…..the HATERS and agitators would STILL BE talking about it. The resolution also included a disclaimer: Nothing in it authorizes or supports any legal claims against the United States, and the resolution does not settle any claims. >>>>>>>>> A sorry saga: Obama signs Native American apology resolution; fails to draw attention to it By Rob Capriccioso Story Published: Jan 13, 2010 WASHINGTON - Is an apology that’s not said out loud really an apology? What if the person expressing the apology doesn’t draw attention to it? Those are questions that some tribal citizens are asking upon learning that President Barack Obama signed off on the Native American Apology Resolution Dec. 19 as part of a defense appropriations spending bill. The resolution originated in Congress and had passed the Senate as stand-alone legislation in the fall. The House ended up adding the resolution to their version of the defense bill in conference. Sen. Sam Brownback, R-Kan., originally introduced the measure intending "to officially apologize for the past ill-conceived policies by the U.S. government toward the Native peoples of this land and re-affirm our commitment toward healing our nation’s wounds and working toward establishing better relationships rooted in reconciliation." His bill passed the Senate in 2008 and 2009. The version signed by Obama became watered down, not making a direct apology from the government, but rather apologizing "on behalf of the people of the United States to all Native peoples for the many instances of violence, maltreatment, and neglect inflicted on Native peoples by citizens of the United States." …... Washington state Rep. John McCoy, a citizen of the Tulalip Tribes, said he was happy that Obama signed the apology, but he would like a verbal statement. "The president has been pretty busy with high priority stuff, but I’d hope that he’ll select a time and place to make an announcement. I’m sure many tribes will bring this issue to the forefront with him." McCoy believes tribal citizens should take the development as a win, and move on in a meaningful way. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
TO TMSYR11: There you go trying to create an NDN-related controversy where none exists. You cite the recent shooting of a history professor at Delta State and suggest that MAYBE, JUST MAYBE he was killed for disagreeing with a student (let's just say it, a Native student). Well nice try, but I think me and most of my fellow savages here understand English better than you give us credit for, but more importantly we understand your intent as well. You have no idea why this killing took place and neither do the police! __________________________________ "We do not have the suspect in custody at this moment, but we are actively pursuing him," Bingham said. He declined to detail a motive in the case. "Right now we have no motive," Bingham said, "and we're not going to speculate on a motive until we have facts in hand." http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/14/us/mississippi-delta-state/index.html _________________________________ Dare I say it? You're an asshole for using someone's personal tragedy for your ridiculous Conservative agenda.

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
TO TMSYR11 (you said): Fundamental true value of Dine' have long ago, put this tragedy away considering THEY rightfully and purposefully agreed this happened long ago and 'why' DWELL and bring up the past! ________________________ Wrong again! But it's not just the stories; 150 years later, the consequences of the Long Walk are still present, says Jennifer Denetdale, a historian and associate professor of American studies at the University of New Mexico. She says severe poverty, addiction, suicide and crime on reservations all have their roots in the Long Walk. "I think it's really been a struggle to believe in our own ability to create, on the Navajo Nation, institutions and structures that will bring about prosperity and a way to live well," Denetdale says. http://www.npr.org/2014/01/27/265041262/legacy-of-forced-march-still-haunts-navajo-nation ______________________________ I can tell you are a Conservative because A. you blame Obama for everything and B. You don't rely on FACTS!

tmsyr11's picture
tmsyr11
Submitted by tmsyr11 on
mm: I believe 6-7 generations of tradition, teachings, stories out-weighes any semblance of a 'kollege' degree and effort of ONE writer. Somewhere in that mix is ol' Chris Columbus as well. But if the writer's words should be taken, then why is it hard to accept/believe Navajo ceremonies were carried out on and performed to put these tragedies away upon returning from Hweeldi. Many DIne elders and teachers were against the NM State Bosque Redendo "Memorial" of opening as far back as 1970s….maybe because of opening up 'old wounds and tragedies'. If this is true……then whose fault is it in response to the writer's words? >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> It is factual and reportable to conclude that Barrack Obama signed the "Apology". Are you saying now it is not TRUE? Where were you when the US Govt apologized on behalf of THOSE American people instead of TOO Indian people? Are you aware though of the 'disclaimer' by the United States in the Apology? >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Again……with the name calling.

tmsyr11's picture
tmsyr11
Submitted by tmsyr11 on
mm: if the Dine Traditional view and practice is too…..hokey……then the alternative to the writer's biased view (Denetdale) fits just as well….just replace "Redskin" with "Navajo Long Walk"… >>>>>>>>>>>>> The below is worth repeating over and over and over again. Sexual abuse, alcoholism, diabetes, domestic violence, etc. existed long before the MASCOT-invention. Sad to say. >>>>>> tmsyr11 I'm sorry, I cannot see the connection between the Good Dr's medical 'opinion' on the Washington Redskin name and the problems that exist today on indian reservations, especially the poorer, Western Indian tribes, i.e. Navajo Tribe. I located various web-links & articles about the problems and issues and changes faced by Indian tribes. I'm no expert but just a realist and for all practical, sensible purposes, I can't accept the Redskins are in anyway contributing to these problems. In fact, blaming the Washington Redskins name or making Dan Snyder the "bad White-guy" seems….well desperate. I am not even sure if the links will be allowed on the ICTMN, but there are at least 14 links (below) highlighting issues as sexual abuse, alcoholism, diabetes, substance addiction, domestic violence, jails and isolations, etc. (NOTE: but on a side note, Indian Casino revenues are flourishing and obviously going somewhere else). I don't have to look far beyond my tribal relations to witness this happening either. http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnkoppisch/2011/12/1... http://www.spotlightonpoverty.org/ExclusiveComment... http://www.nrcprograms.org/site/PageServer?pagenam... http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/21/us/on-indian-res... http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-t... http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/south-dakotas-... http://www.ibtimes.com/native-americans-tragedy-al... http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jay-tavare/suicide-a... http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/10/10... http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/09/us/09suicide.htm... http://nativetimes.com/news/federal/3297-us-senate... http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-secur... http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/prog... http://www.fronterasdesk.org/content/native-americ... Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/09/10/we-are-not-victims-quechan-people-suicide-and-redskins-156838 Read more at https://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/06/29/houska-open-letter-educators-indian-mascots-harm-your-students-160884

George Geder's picture
George Geder
Submitted by George Geder on
As a Black man, I support you. And as Zora Neale Hurston said; 'Speak, So You Can Speak Again'

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
TO tmsyr11: Your word salad means little. Obama at least SIGNED the apology, maybe he thought it was too insufficient to publicize (and he would be right). I've given you quotes from Dine' spokesmen who attribute the past with causing problems the Navajo face today, but you've chosen to ignore them. That's ALSO how I know you're Conservative - facts don't mean anything to you.

tmsyr11's picture
tmsyr11
Submitted by tmsyr11 on
mm: sorry it looks like you fail. Then again maybe "it should have been advertised" considering that Barack Obama is the Head of US Govt. that so many (too many haters) do not favor. If Barack Obama can only apologize but not call it...."genocide"; why was Prof. Wiseman "threatened" with discipline when the US can't even loudly pronounce......an Apology! My question to you, is it bcause Barack Obama is black that your giving him a.....pass? "Spokeman"? Sorry again, kollege degrees and selective (specific opinions) writings do not compare with 120 years-140 years of Dine' traditions, customs, values. I gave YOU at least 10 web links (liberal) to represent how where why native/indian subjects exist. These are just facts! that you seem to wrestle with than with your regurgative thoughts.

Itshallbedonesoitis's picture
Itshallbedonesoitis
Submitted by Itshallbedonesoitis on
I think Chiitaanibah Johnson is more capable of teaching the history class; she is honest, and she has done her research based on fact and truth vs. the discomfort of calling murder what it is, a crime. A real people speak to the truth of murder and theft and it is painful, naturally. An effective right step is to stop denying a responsibility for the real suffering of a people, Indigenous Americans. The Holy land is here also. The Occupied Territories are here also. The Holocaust is here also. The Terrorism is here also. It is right to feel the shamefulness and sorrow of committing murder, theft and terror against the Indigenous People's of North, Central and South America. They are a real people and deserve a releasing from this long sorrow, the longest war in human history. No real change will happen until that truth is spoken publicly and a real acknowledgement of responsibility and reparations are committed to. The history revisionists are welcome to return to that history, not from their telling of it, but by the peoples experience. Certainly there will not be many travelers on that platform anxiously awaiting with ticket in hand; perhaps a madman who is truthfully looking for a place to be. A lot of time has been wasted in trying to describe, haphazardly, bits and pieces of known and unknown traits and characteristics of a people, when the obvious necessity was to look within and remember that what others did was not nearly as important as was how it was responded to. Look for the prophet who brought down from the mountain a fine treasure, the Creators laws for the people written in beautiful stone. The prophet so filled with disgust he smashed those stones to pieces. There are tears plenty in that to discover. Yet later, and again the Creators laws sacred and true were to be given to the people for safe keeping and living, honorable, and impossible. The dust, remenants of sacred trust and life true, given to the children, and further lost. The discovery matter is the stones with sacred law are not, they were smashed a long time ago. There is a birth of sorrow there to have and to keep with marching feet keeping time at a distant for all those centuries past but its running out of cash and demanding that others pay but does not realize its demand is what it owes for righting wrong, and wronged doing made right. Its getting mixed up when left and right and then its suppose to be right then left, whose turn? The stones beautiful - to dust, a people false may follow. There is measure in knowing oneself first before knowing another in truth.The people of the United States should make it part of their regular constitution, to insist that a day be set aside, a national day of mourning for the genocidal acts committed in the America's, in the people's name against the Native Indigenous people's of many nations natural to this continent. One could call that a true revolution. The international body politic, the United Nations, are encouraged to observe and make the day an international day of mourning and remembrance. These crisis's has been with humanity on every continent and a history abhorrent. Look and see if there is not a pestilence of violence plaguing every state and entrusted to whom? With much value and worth for the killing disease spread around and pretending a natural occurrence is in it, self made millionaire. Immunity from your own disease?The disease belongs to the ones spreading it around, its patented. There is necessity for an unremitting commitment to resolve the disparagement of humanity, it is openness and honesty; in conversation with one another, in the universities and colleges, community and city councils, churches, synagogues, temples, cathedrals, meeting rooms, board rooms, dressing rooms, theater, arts and performance, scientific observations and findings, the doctor's checkup, auto mechanic and bingo hall. The United Nations would do well to reform itself by opening the door of the assembly to any citizen of any nation and provide that individual with the time and respect of addressing the assembly with their uncensored concerns. In some countries a special commission is put together and hearings are held for public input, they call this gathering: Truth and Reconciliation. A governing body's responsibility and duty is to hear the people represent themselves by presenting themselves and their concerns firsthand. As respectful and duty bound ambassadors of humanity - declare any nation with nuclear weapons a threat to all life and send U.N. troops to the offender and seize those weapons that must be destroyed. Next, any nation that sells or gives weapons to another nation: declare it a rogue state to be sanctioned and make all precaution for the prevention of hunger or lack of medicines, water and other basic human necessities for the people. In addition, the U.N. should have a well armed military defense to act quickly and decisively anywhere in the world where conflict breaks out for the sole protection of civilians, not as an enemy or adversary to any nations conflicts, but always an intermediary for peaceful settlements to those conflicts. Rightfully take back your absconded role, it is for the profit of all people of every nation to have peace and security, which none have with the current and historical sitting 'security council'. The people must be able to request protection from the state's abuses directly of the international body. It is also sound and necessary that an international judiciary of reputable integrity be seated to hear such grievances against a state that is contemptuous of international laws, treaties and binding agreements. Furthermore and making clarity, N.A.T.O. is an unauthorized and illegal criminal organization, as are the other various groups, such as Nazi's, KKK, and any affiliates of those who gather to promote hatred and violence or prepare for war against any group of people in the world. Observers and monitors are necessarily sent to report and observe the activities of those engaged in such terrorism and marshal the U.N. military to any area where there exists danger of violence being perpetrated or planned upon another people. The credibility of the United Nations is in its resolute commitment and unwavering determination to fulfill its duties, obligations, and responsibilities for the peoples of this earth by preventing another human holocaust, which is also a commitment of preventing a holocaust to the earth. Humanity can and must win so that the very idea of war or any inhumane act becomes its own law, unthinkable. In as much as the people require, some are ready and some are not - the United Nations must be refashioned to the distinct needs of the people from all the regions of the earth so that it truly is a gathering of the peoples of the many regions and nations of the earth and a U.N. no longer belonging to states. The people are capable of managing their communications and affairs with one another. The greatest need is, and has been, in remembering how to be a human being; then it will be resolute and blind ignorance removed. Whatever our differences as a people may exist, we know that there is one humanity and one earth. The end of crisis. Your life has meaning and is meaningful to you if you are helping humanity to move in this direction. Money will not mean a thing to anyone in time, it has a false value on everything and devalues all of us, all the time. We will laugh at ourselves for thinking we ever needed it. The greatest treasure to be discovered is the whole, the all of we, us, you and me. Our employment is the restoration of humanity and the earth. Intelligence knows; the Earth understands. It was our promise and this life our gift. Happy Birthday to everyone, your day was our day too. How happy it is to be born - and how joyous it is to live, we have every natural need to know within and every where all around.

deeceevoice's picture
deeceevoice
Submitted by deeceevoice on
Judging from his name, Maury Wiseman is a Jew. He should know better. I wonder if the university would be so willing to sit back and claim impotence in this matter had Wiseman been a gentile Holocaust denier. The public outcry would have been loud and long. It seems to me that Wiseman has comparative genocide envy -- as sick as that sounds -- and, as a result, feels the need minimize monstrous brutality and deny the true nature of the genocide against this nation's indigenous peoples. There's no excuse for this, and there should be ZERO tolerance for it. Something needs to be done to hold him and other professors to account for lies they tell in the classroom. If, indeed, the university president's hands are tied, then Wiseman's contract should not be renewed after this term. The Pope's canonization of Junipero Sera yesterday makes this story particularly galling/insulting to the Native community. As an African-American of also Tsalagi ancestry, I would be no less outraged had Wiseman stood before his class and argued that the depredations suffered by my African ancestors never happened. Disgraceful!

Kathryn Wild PhD
Submitted by Kathryn Wild PhD on
I had a white professor of California history. He said that the missionaries looked at the Indians as their pets. As a 50-something PhD adult Native American, I raised my hand and said that I challenged that perspective because they would never treat their pets the way they treated the Indians. OMG, the retiring professor had a total meltdown. It was all he could do to not throw me out of his class and flunk me on the spot. Yikes!! Is the struggle still about Cowboys vs. Indians? "Shining lights not welcome here!"

Tohbi Issi
Submitted by Tohbi Issi on
This entire thing is disgusting. I'm definitely going to be working harder to attend school out of state after this. No one should have to say "It is what it is" after going through this.

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
To tmysr11 You learned a big word: "regurgative" See if your dictionary can help you spell college.

Michael Madrid's picture
Michael Madrid
Submitted by Michael Madrid on
To tmysr11: Here's proof that you don't even read the articles you provide links for: (from the Native Times article): Dorgan said the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, approved as the part of the health care overhaul signed by President Barack Obama, would authorize a comprehensive youth suicide prevention effort on Indian reservations. The bill also boosts mental health resources throughout Indian Country. _______________________________________________________ I'm guessing you have trouble finding CREDIBLE sources that reflect your personal opinions. I'm also guessing you're at least smart enough to know that I'll just laugh if you start quoting Faux News or Glen "Batshit" Beck!.

Bill Brown
Bill Brown
Submitted by Bill Brown on
'Think your Dad's right, Ms Johnson- the transcending narrative of your experience is the 'awareness' you've created-it has a 'rippling' effect on 'all' it 'contacts'.

Bill Brown
Bill Brown
Submitted by Bill Brown on
'Think your Dad's right, Ms Johnson- the transcending narrative of your experience is the 'awareness' you've created-it has a 'rippling' effect on 'all' it 'contacts'.

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