ihs-tsethlikia-public-health-nurse-new-mexico
Brett Butterstein/AP
Nina Tsethlikia, a public health nurse with Indian Health Service’s Public Health Division, calls a doctor at the Indian Health Service Center in Gallup, New Mexico before visiting with a patient.

Is Shoddy Cancer Care for Natives a Treaty Violation?

ICTMN Staff
7/20/16

A recent Newsweek feature begins with a well-known Indian country adage, “Don’t get sick after June.” This is because by then the under-funded Indian Health Service has run out of money.

The feature goes on to talk about the high incidence of colorectal cancer among Native Americans—53 percent higher than non-Hispanic whites, and 115 percent for Alaska Natives. Newsweek notes that some of the cause is genetics and lifestyle, but lack of screening is also to blame.

Natives rely on the Indian Health Service, a government-funded service that is supposed to meet treaty obligations to provide health care to Native Americans. The IHS is not able to meet those obligations, and does not even cover preventive cancer screenings, like colonoscopies, Newsweek points out.

“Thus far, given the option, Congress would rather let Indians die than adequately fund the Indian Health Service,” Donald Warne, the first Native doctor to serve on the national board of directors of the American Cancer Society, told Newsweek. “We are not receiving ‘all proper care and protection’”—the specifics guaranteed by the tribal treaties—“so, in truth, the federal government is in violation of the treaties. And the treaties are essentially contracts. I think if there’s an unnecessary death, you should look at how the federal government is in breach of contract in allowing unnecessary death.”

Read the full feature by Newsweek, published July 19, 2016, here.

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arachiya's picture
arachiya
Submitted by arachiya on
The Federal government has very rarely kept any agreement it has ever made with Native Americans. They work with Doctors and pharmaceuticals to keep a cure, and treatment, out of everyone's hands because they can not profit from it when people can get it for free. It is a plant called CLEAVERS. There are directions to the amount used and how often to take it but it treats all cancers and is drank as a tea with honey. The only side effects may be weight loss. The tea bag can be used to treat tumors externally and it works not only on humans but other animals. My sister's horse had a grapefruit sized tumor on its leg. I gave her two weeks worth of Cleavers tea bags and the tumor shrank to the size of a gold ball in two week. She ran out of the tea bags but the tumors has not grown in size after a year's time. Painless, no nasty side effects, no hair loss, no surgery. Cleavers, it is considered a weed (that government and lawn care services encourage you to destroy) and has been used by Natives of the Americas and Europe for centuries.

arachiya's picture
arachiya
Submitted by arachiya on
The Federal government has very rarely kept any agreement it has ever made with Native Americans. They work with Doctors and pharmaceuticals to keep a cure, and treatment, out of everyone's hands because they can not profit from it when people can get it for free. It is a plant called CLEAVERS. There are directions to the amount used and how often to take it but it treats all cancers and is drank as a tea with honey. The only side effects may be weight loss. The tea bag can be used to treat tumors externally and it works not only on humans but other animals. My sister's horse had a grapefruit sized tumor on its leg. I gave her two weeks worth of Cleavers tea bags and the tumor shrank to the size of a gold ball in two week. She ran out of the tea bags but the tumors has not grown in size after a year's time. Painless, no nasty side effects, no hair loss, no surgery. Cleavers, it is considered a weed (that government and lawn care services encourage you to destroy) and has been used by Natives of the Americas and Europe for centuries.
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