Choctaw code talkers during World War I

Video: 'I Am the Warrior': The Native American Warrior Is the Guardian, the Defender of Our Native Lands

ICTMN Staff
11/26/12

 

This moving 3.5 minute video is writer/director Gary Robinson’s interpretation of what it has meant for Native Americans to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces from the Revolutionary War to modern times. This award-winning production was featured in the Veterans Day Short Film Competition held by the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Mr. Robinson examines the question: Why does the Native American fight for the U.S., which at one point had sought to exterminate his people? It’s a remarkable survey of Native involvement and service with the U.S. Armed Forces.

The video was written and directed by Gary Robinson. Flute music was composed and performed by Peter Olmos. The video was produced by Tribal Eye Productions. To see further work by Mr. Robinson and Tribal Eye Productions, please click here.

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Comments

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
This is a very positive video and our children and our future leaders need to see and hear how we really are as a Nation on Turtle Island. Thanks

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
I too have served in the military.....I am Ojibewe....I am a woman warrior. I really liked the video minus the fact you left out native women.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Submitted by Anonymous on
Well done! Hopefully this video will find the hands of the apathetic, motivating them to join the work for a "united" nation.

Martin Edwin Andersen's picture
Martin Edwin An...
Submitted by Martin Edwin An... on
Also see: "Flags of Their Stepfathers? Race and Culture in the Context of Military Service and the Fight for Citizenship," in Eastwood's Iwo Jima: Critical Engagements With Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima, Anne Gjelsvik and Rikke Schubart (eds.; Columbia University Press, 2013)

Martin Edwin Andersen's picture
Martin Edwin An...
Submitted by Martin Edwin An... on
Also see: "Flags of Their Stepfathers? Race and Culture in the Context of Military Service and the Fight for Citizenship," in Eastwood's Iwo Jima: Critical Engagements With Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima, Anne Gjelsvik and Rikke Schubart (eds.; Columbia University Press, 2013)

Chris Kiana Sr., BBA, MBA, MA-RD, DBA/ABD's picture
Chris Kiana Sr....
Submitted by Chris Kiana Sr.... on
In Alaska, there are 77,000 Veterans, and out of this group, many of us are Native Americans. Myself, I am a Combat Vietnam Veteran (1968-1969). We are essentially decentralized up here pertaining to Native American Veterans, who live in a state 1/3rd the size of the United States of America. We have a high percentage of veterans in Anchorage, Alaska, out of about 25,000 Native Americans living here. There is more... But for now, this is a contact.

Chris Kiana Sr., BBA, MBA, MA-RD, DBA/ABD's picture
Chris Kiana Sr....
Submitted by Chris Kiana Sr.... on
I am a Vietnam Combat Veteran (1968-1969) and a Native American. This is one of the most outstanding short videos I have ever seen! I tried to stay out of the Vietnam War, but when my 2nd cousin got KIA 7/28/67 in Vietnam, I joined and went to war. I had originally tried to keep Kermit LaBelle from joining in the first place. First morning of boot camp in San Diego, CA on 8/18/67, two E-6s' came out screaming to our company of 62 soon-to-be-swabby sailors, "Who wants to volunteer for Viet Nam!" One of them walked up to me, "How come you didn't volunteer for Vietnam!?" Told him back, "What the hell for! I am going to end up there anyway!" To Vietnam I went trotting, as many warriors have before me in different wars, many with different but destructive weapons.
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